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Sample rate and Bit Rate display peripheral


fritzg

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Bump. Does nothing like this exist?

 

Probably not much demand for such a device as most DACs display the sample rate of the music being played.

Sometimes it's like someone took a knife, baby
Edgy and dull and cut a six inch valley
Through the middle of my skull

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If you only wish to confirm your amp/DAC is working correctly by checking this, there are some simple ways to accomplish that. If you want a display to show what rate and bit depth are all the time, then I don't know a simple way for you to do that.

And always keep in mind: Cognitive biases, like seeing optical illusions are a sign of a normally functioning brain. We all have them, it’s nothing to be ashamed about, but it is something that affects our objective evaluation of reality. 

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Yes, there is one. It is called a DAC or DDC with indicators or a screen. The cheapest option I can think of is a DIYINHK USB>I2S converter.

I want to test the sample rate being output by various devices, USB and coax. Is there a peripheral I can put in the chain to see it displayed?

 

Thanks.

Forrest:

Win10 i9 9900KS/GTX1060 HQPlayer4>Win10 NAA

DSD>Pavel's DSC2.6>Bent Audio TAP>

Parasound JC1>"Naked" Quad ESL63/Tannoy PS350B subs<100Hz

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If you only wish to confirm your amp/DAC is working correctly by checking this, there are some simple ways to accomplish that. If you want a display to show what rate and bit depth are all the time, then I don't know a simple way for you to do that.

 

I want to confirm what the signal is that is being sent to the DAC. What simple ways are there to accomplish that?

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I want to confirm what the signal is that is being sent to the DAC. What simple ways are there to accomplish that?

 

You can't easily confirm the difference in 16 or 24 bit. With sample rate it is reasonably simple. Use Audacity or similar software. Create a file at the various sample rates. Insert a sine wave that can't be reproduced by lower rates.

 

For instance create a 30 khz tone at -20 db in a 88.2 or 96 khz file. 44 and 48 rates won't be able to reproduce it. A simple AC voltmeter should be sufficient to see if the signal is there or absent. You can do a 192 khz file using 60 khz tone which 96 and 88 khz can't reproduce. This can be checked at the amp/DAC output. This is enough to confirm you are outputting the higher rates. Optimally you need to confirm the ac voltmeter will respond at higher frequencies. Most in my experience will even if the response is drooping. You just need to see if the frequency is there or not there.

 

A WARNING: do be careful and keep the tones well below max level. You can easily burn out tweeters with sounds you can't hear. If your not sure about this procedure, ask some more questions or don't do it. Just to be safe. Hate for advice to damage someone's equipment.

And always keep in mind: Cognitive biases, like seeing optical illusions are a sign of a normally functioning brain. We all have them, it’s nothing to be ashamed about, but it is something that affects our objective evaluation of reality. 

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