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Article: Amazon Offers Unlimited Cloud Storage For $59.99 Per Year


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Hi Mav - Certainly a reasonable question. I personally don't want to control it. one I upload the music I can forget about it. If this was on my own hard drives I have to worry about a host of things such as accidentally deleting it, bad drives, losing it, theft, fire, etc...

 

To me the ToS # 3.3 aren't a bother. It's the cost of doing this kind of business. I pay $59.99, they can have a liberal ToS policy.

 

I don't know, I got stung by Carbonite after 4 years, fine print in which they say unlimited but after 200gb it takes forever to upload and god help ya if you had to do a recovery. Maybe I'm gun shy of "cloud" storage by a third party, I might try amazon just to see.

 

We currently keep two complete PC copies including external hard drives at our bank along with other important items for $33.00 a year.

 

Carry on, :)

The Truth Is Out There

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Jud are you reading the same thing as me http://www.amazon.com/gp/help/custom...deId=201376540

 

3.3 Our Use of Your Files to Provide the Service. We may use, access, and retain Your Files in order to provide the Service to you and enforce the terms of the Agreement, and you give us all permissions we need to do so. These permissions include, for example, the rights to copy Your Files for backup purposes, modify Your Files to enable access in different formats, use information about Your Files to organize them on your behalf, and access Your Files to provide technical support.

 

Yes, but reading it with knowledge of (1) what's routine in the industry; (2) what Amazon needs in order to run this service; and (3) what I as an attorney would draft, given #2.

 

I've bolded what Amazon needs in order to run this service. It will need to copy your files between servers in order to keep them backed up; it will need to be able to modify them and access them in these modified formats (e.g., compress them for storage and access them in that format); keep the files organized in the folders you create or automagically in ways customers often desire, such as organizing photos automatically by date or event ("organize them on your behalf"); and access them if you call tech support and say "I can't download my photos/music, what's going on??" So that's what I'm concentrating on, the specific purposes for which you would be giving Amazon permission to access your files.

 

You, on the other hand, are no doubt looking at all the different things you would be giving Amazon permission to do (not necessarily the specific purposes) - i.e., everything I haven't bolded - and are saying "Holy crap, they can do any damn thing they want to my poor files!" I get it, and I'm not here to tell you that you should feel comfortable with these terms if you don't, or that you should use Amazon's service if you prefer not to. I'm just telling you the way I personally read that language.

One never knows, do one? - Fats Waller

The fairest thing we can experience is the mysterious. It is the fundamental emotion which stands at the cradle of true art and true science. - Einstein

Computer, Audirvana -> optical to EtherREGEN -> microRendu -> USPCB -> ISO Regen -> USPCB -> Pro-Ject Pre Box S2 DAC -> Spectral DMC-12 & DMA-150 -> Vandersteen 3A Signature.

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I don't know, I got stung by Carbonite after 4 years, fine print in which they say unlimited but after 200gb it takes forever to upload and god help ya if you had to do a recovery. Maybe I'm gun shy of "cloud" storage by a third party, I might try amazon just to see.

 

We currently keep two complete PC copies including external hard drives at our bank along with other important items for $33.00 a year.

 

Carry on, :)

 

You are completely correct about Carbonite and all of the rest of the services out there, except for OpenDrive. They do not throttle their speeds at all.

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You can't use Chrome for uploading? Or, the dedicated desktop apps?

 

thanks, but the short answer for Chrome is "no".

the long answer for the desktop app is that I did test it with some doc folders.

Don't know if the app is faster or slower than the browser, but from the test, it appears that

running 24 hours a day, it would take close to a month to upload my music/pic/doc files - and that presumes that

pics and music will load at the same rate as docs ( I don't know). And yes, I have a high speed connection.

In any case, I didn't think a month was practical. Maybe my expectations are too high. Regardless, thanks for the suggestion; there may be a solution in here yet.

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Yes, but reading it with knowledge of (1) what's routine in the industry; (2) what Amazon needs in order to run this service; and (3) what I as an attorney would draft, given #2.

 

I've bolded what Amazon needs in order to run this service. It will need to copy your files between servers in order to keep them backed up; it will need to be able to modify them and access them in these modified formats (e.g., compress them for storage and access them in that format); keep the files organized in the folders you create or automagically in ways customers often desire, such as organizing photos automatically by date or event ("organize them on your behalf"); and access them if you call tech support and say "I can't download my photos/music, what's going on??" So that's what I'm concentrating on, the specific purposes for which you would be giving Amazon permission to access your files.

 

You, on the other hand, are no doubt looking at all the different things you would be giving Amazon permission to do (not necessarily the specific purposes) - i.e., everything I haven't bolded - and are saying "Holy crap, they can do any damn thing they want to my poor files!" I get it, and I'm not here to tell you that you should feel comfortable with these terms if you don't, or that you should use Amazon's service if you prefer not to. I'm just telling you the way I personally read that language.

 

Thanks Jud, I'm no attorney but I did stay in a Holiday Inn Express once :) I think I will give it a try.

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Well I gave up - I think the 3 month trial would be over before my music files finished uploading...

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For me, as Chris said, to have a virtually bullet proof backup, accessible from almost anywhere for only $60/year is a steal.

If all of my backups go bad, which I grant is very unlikely, I not only have a very reliable backup in place, I have the psychological comfort of knowing that almost no matter what, my music collection (as well as other valuable files) are very secure.

For me, that feeling of comfort alone makes the service worthwhile.

Joel

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I ask why ? why not just back up your data yourself at home. External storage is so cheap and you control it all. .

 

Belt and suspenders.

I already have 3 HHD backups located in three separate physical locations.

but eventually..... the drives will fail for one reason or another. Cloud storage

basically pays for someone else to worry about that.

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For me, as Chris said, to have a virtually bullet proof backup, accessible from almost anywhere for only $60/year is a steal.

If all of my backups go bad, which I grant is very unlikely, I not only have a very reliable backup in place, I have the psychological comfort of knowing that almost no matter what, my music collection (as well as other valuable files) are very secure.

For me, that feeling of comfort alone makes the service worthwhile.

Joel

 

I tried out Amazon's limited music storage locker before and wasn't too impressed. So, I'm not so sure a back-up solution with them is "bullet proof". I've also used a few other cloud storage services both personally and professionally and have found them wanting. So, call me skeptical till I hear some real world results of how easy it is to do incremental backups and to retrieve items.

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Or you could subscribe to Office 365 and get unlimited Cloud Storage and Office 365 for a bit more. Microsoft has been offering that deal for some time now.

 

https://www.thurrott.com/cloud/microsoft-consumer-services/onedrive/2389/amazon-offers-unlimited-cloud-storage-for-individuals-how-does-it-compare-to-onedrive

 

It's my understanding that you only get 1tb of OneDrive cloud storage with Office 365, not unlimited. That link also suggests that it's only 1tb. So not quite the same thing as unlimited cloud storage.

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It's my understanding that you only get 1tb of OneDrive cloud storage with Office 365, not unlimited. That link also suggests that it's only 1tb. So not quite the same thing as unlimited cloud storage.

 

Hmmm, 1tb is still pretty good. And OneDrive integrates with a Synology NAS.

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Hmmm, 1tb is still pretty good. And OneDrive integrates with a Synology NAS.

 

1TB is indeed pretty good, but I'm at ~700GB just with downloads and only about 10-15% of my CDs ripped. Looks like that won't be quite enough for me.

One never knows, do one? - Fats Waller

The fairest thing we can experience is the mysterious. It is the fundamental emotion which stands at the cradle of true art and true science. - Einstein

Computer, Audirvana -> optical to EtherREGEN -> microRendu -> USPCB -> ISO Regen -> USPCB -> Pro-Ject Pre Box S2 DAC -> Spectral DMC-12 & DMA-150 -> Vandersteen 3A Signature.

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1TB is indeed pretty good, but I'm at ~700GB just with downloads and only about 10-15% of my CDs ripped. Looks like that won't be quite enough for me.

 

Yes, well, I'm up to about 6TB in music, so 1TB definitely doesn't cut it for me for offsite cloud storage. But I'll keep looking ;)

CAPS Pipeline with HDPlex Linear PSU running Win10 64 bit, AO 2.0, RoonServer, HQPlayer -> T+A DAC8 DSD -> Linear Tube Audio's MicroZOTL2 Headphone Amp with Mojo Audio's Illuminati Linear PSU -> Focal Utopia/Audeze LCD-3

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It's my understanding that you only get 1tb of OneDrive cloud storage with Office 365, not unlimited. That link also suggests that it's only 1tb. So not quite the same thing as unlimited cloud storage.

 

No, it's now unlimited. And a personal license via keycode(one pc/Mac and one tablet/ipad) is only $34 at Amazon, with all the Microsft products and unlimited OneDrive. I need to check on synch with my Synology, Could be the new no-brainer.

 

http://blogs.office.com/2014/10/27/onedrive-now-unlimited-storage-office-365-subscribers/

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I decided to give Amazon Cloud Drive a try and started uploading yesterday. In the past 24 hours I've uploaded 630 GB of music files. I'm using an ethernet connection from a NAS running Windows Home Server 2011 that I installed the Cloud Drive app on. My files are in various folders from about 10 GB to 1.2 TB with a total of 3.6 TB. So far I haven't had any problems or slow downs.

 

Chris, I'll be really interested in your review of the Thecus NAS, it's one I've been looking at.

 

Ed

 

 

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Now I see why you're experimenting with optimizing DC rips. ;-)

 

I'll definitely have more CDs than anything else for the foreseeable future. I don't keep the offline conversions around, because algorithms are improving for one thing, and who knows what resolution DACs will be running at in a few years?

One never knows, do one? - Fats Waller

The fairest thing we can experience is the mysterious. It is the fundamental emotion which stands at the cradle of true art and true science. - Einstein

Computer, Audirvana -> optical to EtherREGEN -> microRendu -> USPCB -> ISO Regen -> USPCB -> Pro-Ject Pre Box S2 DAC -> Spectral DMC-12 & DMA-150 -> Vandersteen 3A Signature.

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No, it's now unlimited. And a personal license via keycode(one pc/Mac and one tablet/ipad) is only $34 at Amazon, with all the Microsft products and unlimited OneDrive. I need to check on synch with my Synology, Could be the new no-brainer.

 

http://blogs.office.com/2014/10/27/onedrive-now-unlimited-storage-office-365-subscribers/

 

Very nice. Synology syncs with CloudSync, but looks like it only allows one folder.

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"unlimited" sounds great to me, and the price is really low!

 

But the amount of time it takes for a new full backup - and - FOR A FULL RECOVERY of my entire music collection which is between 2 and 3 TB ...

 

Would be nice, if we could get real world time values for 1 TB :)

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I decided to give Amazon Cloud Drive a try and started uploading yesterday. In the past 24 hours I've uploaded 630 GB of music files. I'm using an ethernet connection from a NAS running Windows Home Server 2011 that I installed the Cloud Drive app on. My files are in various folders from about 10 GB to 1.2 TB with a total of 3.6 TB. So far I haven't had any problems or slow downs.

 

Chris, I'll be really interested in your review of the Thecus NAS, it's one I've been looking at.

 

Ed

 

Hi Ed,

 

sounds promising. How fast is your line?

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You are completely correct about Carbonite and all of the rest of the services out there, except for OpenDrive. They do not throttle their speeds at all.

 

I use CrashPlan. They do not throttle upload into their service. I have over 5TB backed up with them. Mac, Linux, Windows, and few NAS' as well. I have the family plan, so all my computers and my server are back uped up there. I also have local backups.

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