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What matters poll?


Philosophy which best describes you?  

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I assume you mean music recordings, correct? For that I voted Everything Matters because if any part of the recording process is compromised there is diminishment. For me everything matters from selection of recording site (concert hall, jazz club, better studio etc.) to microphones and microphone placement, resolution of the master recording, and the release format being as close to the master in sonics as possible.

 

I also prefer recordings in which the balancing, levels, etc. are determined before the recording process begins rather than engineers fixing it in the mix later. I also prefer no monkeying with the sound and as little editing as possible.

 

Yes, I believe everything matters and the best recordings in my opinion are the ones some call "photographic recordings" allowing us to here the sound as it was heard at the original recording site.

I have dementia. I save all my posts in a text file I call Forums.  I do a search in that file to find out what I said or did in the past.

 

I still love music.

 

Teresa

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  • 2 weeks later...

I stated in Post 2 above that for me Everything Matters. I searched my blog and discovered I wrote an article about this five years ago on February 24, 2009.

 

Everything is important to make a great enjoyable recording.

 

  1. The Master should to be recorded with high enough resolution using at least 24 Bit 88.2kHz PCM, DXD or preferably DSD to accurately capture the music being presented. If recording in the analog realm the highest quality mastering tape run at 30 or 15 IPS should be used.

  2. Microphones with the smoothest and widest frequency response should be used, at least to 40kHz or if on hand some of the newer microphones that extend to 100kHz.

  3. The concert hall or room, needs to be studied and mapped for correct microphone placement and this can take up to a week to do in a hall a record company has never recorded before.

  4. Get the balances and everything else correct before the start of the recording with an aim to make a photographic recording using as little mixing and editing as possible. Fixing it in the mix is what decreases the spontaneity and realism of many recordings.

  5. Keep everything high resolution digital or high resolution analog until the end product.

  6. That end product should be an SACD, LP or at the very least a high resolution download. Releasing it only on CD sacrifices most of the work done in steps 1-5.

 

I would like to add on a personal note that I also have to like the music. With that said I am shocked that I am the only one to vote for "Everything Matters" as I don't understand what could be removed without causing diminishment of musical enjoyment?

 

I also apologize that my blog is seldom updated and why I no longer write articles for it, for more info see my Personal Message.

I have dementia. I save all my posts in a text file I call Forums.  I do a search in that file to find out what I said or did in the past.

 

I still love music.

 

Teresa

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As I see it, if some things matter more than other things [matter], implicitly everything matters.

"Relax, it's only hi-fi. There's never been a hi-fi emergency." - Roy Hall

"Not everything that can be counted counts, and not everything that counts can be counted." - William Bruce Cameron

 

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I wasn't really thinking about recording when I started this poll. I wanted to know whether and to what extent folks have any type of guiding philosophy in how they approach playback setup.

 

I stated in Post 2 above that for me Everything Matters. I searched my blog and discovered I wrote an article about this five years ago on February 24, 2009.

 

Everything is important to make a great enjoyable recording.

 

  1. The Master should to be recorded with high enough resolution using at least 24 Bit 88.2kHz PCM, DXD or preferably DSD to accurately capture the music being presented. If recording in the analog realm the highest quality mastering tape run at 30 or 15 IPS should be used.

  2. Microphones with the smoothest and widest frequency response should be used, at least to 40kHz or if on hand some of the newer microphones that extend to 100kHz.

  3. The concert hall or room, needs to be studied and mapped for correct microphone placement and this can take up to a week to do in a hall a record company has never recorded before.

  4. Get the balances and everything else correct before the start of the recording with an aim to make a photographic recording using as little mixing and editing as possible. Fixing it in the mix is what decreases the spontaneity and realism of many recordings.

  5. Keep everything high resolution digital or high resolution analog until the end product.

  6. That end product should be an SACD, LP or at the very least a high resolution download. Releasing it only on CD sacrifices most of the work done in steps 1-5.

 

I would like to add on a personal note that I also have to like the music. With that said I am shocked that I am the only one to vote for "Everything Matters" as I don't understand what could be removed without causing diminishment of musical enjoyment?

 

I also apologize that my blog is seldom updated and why I no longer write articles for it, for more info see my Personal Message.

THINK OUTSIDE THE BOX

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Which philosophy BEST describes you?

 

If the first choice was worded as or intended to mean, "Everything matters equally", then I would opt for "Some things matter a lot more than others". :)

"Relax, it's only hi-fi. There's never been a hi-fi emergency." - Roy Hall

"Not everything that can be counted counts, and not everything that counts can be counted." - William Bruce Cameron

 

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I wasn't really thinking about recording when I started this poll. I wanted to know whether and to what extent folks have any type of guiding philosophy in how they approach playback setup.

 

Sorry I misunderstood, however my vote remains the same: Everything Matters because an audio system is only as good as its weakest link. Since I don't believe there is yet a perfect to the source audio system, we all have to compromise. Since I am poor my compromises would be along the lines of affordable cost and durability. And because I like nice looking things, physical appearance is also important to me. I bought what sounds the most realistic to me within my budget.

I have dementia. I save all my posts in a text file I call Forums.  I do a search in that file to find out what I said or did in the past.

 

I still love music.

 

Teresa

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As much as I want to say everything matters, I guess I have to admit that I'm willing to compromise. I think it's always been this way, and everyone has their own pecking order. This was certainly consistent with the design philosophy in many high end lines. A designer would strive to achieve a sound that matched their sense of what mattered--with the undestanding that some compromise was necessary.

 

Me, I'll take PRAT and tonal neutrality over a thunderous bass or soundstage width, but then, I do fully expect on decent recordings to have no sense of where my speakers are, and wouldn't accept a system that doesn't have precise, rock solid imaging. I'm just beginning to play with a second speaker/amp system at home right now (Alpair 10PeN and 1.8 watt Wire BalBal amp), and am having a hard time on some cuts deciding what presentation is better. I have no way of knowing which is closest to the reality of the recordings. The new system produces a palpable recreation on small recordings, the old system still can't handle a full ffff, but sure gives a better sense of the room volume and (for now at least) soundstage depth and height, not to mention the greater volume and bass extension possible.

 

But, when it comes to optimizing, everything does seem to matter--it's the old weak link situation. Clean electricity, vibration control, EM interference, room interaction, etc. I'm not sure where to draw the line there.

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