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Large CD Ripping Project


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My father has 1000+ CDs spanning all genres and I have tasked myself with ripping them to a hard drive. I'm an audio engineer so I have a plan for format of conversion, though I am now considering PhileAudio because it could rip a lossless version and a compressed version from that, also may offer increased efficiency and multi-drive support.

I have the following computers to rip with:

PowerMac G5 (PowerPC, so likely iTunes rip)

MacBook Pro Core2Duo

MacBook Pro i7

iMac i5

Microsoft Surface i5 (if I decide to throw a PC in the mix)

 

I have ordered one each of these extra drives to try in order to speed the process, was going to stick with brands I know but I went by Amazon rating barring any specific Mac incompatibility:

LG

Buffalo

Coolead

Samsung

 

Looking to get a 4TB USB 3.0 and Firewire or Thunderbolt drive for lossless storage, should have enough space on the home computer for the compressed collection.

 

My concept is to have some friends over who like music, bait them with booze and free music, and have a rip party. If anyone has any ideas for organization, workflow or anything else please let me know!

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I would recommend that you avoid using iTunes for ripping, since it is not a secure ripper. PhileAudio does not appear to be a secure ripper either.

On Windows, dBpoweramp is always my recommendation, since it does secure ripping and detects the drive's features in the initial setup.

 

I'm not sure what the best option is for a PowerPC Mac. I might even suggest that you skip the PPC Macs and only rip using the Intel ones.

There is a beta version of dBpoweramp for OS X available now, or you can use XLD.

 

dBpoweramp on Windows has a multi-encoder that can produce lossless and lossy versions of the tracks at the same time. I'm not sure whether the Mac version offers this yet.

 

 

Personally, I'd suggest that you rip to FLAC as it is the most robust lossless audio format, though if you have a lot of Macs you might prefer to use ALAC.

 

I would definitely recommend that you buy two drives for storage so that you have at least one backup. No point spending all that time and effort to rip 1000 CDs only to have the drive die and lose them all.

And be sure to keep your backup as a backup. I've seen a lot of people with multiple computers move both drives around the computers due to the convenience of having a "spare drive". The backup drive should only ever be connected to the computer when creating a backup.

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Sorry, no iTunes please.

 

For such task You need XLD software ( X Lossless Decoder: Lossless audio decoder for Mac OS X ) And because You have G5 Tower, You need proper reading drive - LiteOn. Amazon.com: Lite-On Super AllWrite 24X SATA DVD+/-RW Dual Layer Drive - Bulk - IHAS124-04 (Black): Electronics

 

Those four drives in Your list are total crap, because they are slim drives inside. And only LG maybe, just maybe can work as expected.

G5 has probably Nec OptiArc AD-7200 drives, those are average writters but not good readers. LiteOn is good reader and above average writter also. In my intel macpro I have a Sony OptiArc AD-5280S-CB-ROBOT drive for writing (this is VinPower Digital version with special FW, intended actually for working in Duplicator Towers 24/7) and LiteOn for reading and scanning duties. And XLD naturally :).

 

In Your post I see, You are audio engineer. So, Your primary concern must be a Quality - not the speed. Remember this.

Sorry, english is not my native language.

Fools and fanatics are always certain of themselves, but wiser people are full of doubts.

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The backup drive should only ever be connected to the computer when creating a backup.

A big concern for me! I want this collection to make it down to my kids, so future proofing and archiving is imperative. Any advice on how to acquire a drive that is tested and broken in? and where to put it after... safe deposit box?

 

So, Your primary concern must be a Quality - not the speed. Remember this.

Thank you for opening my eyes to the evils of different drives and ripping software. I clearly have a lot to learn!

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My concept is to have some friends over who like music, bait them with booze and free music, and have a rip party. If anyone has any ideas for organization, workflow or anything else please let me know!

 

One of the most time consuming, and I think very important, aspects of ripping CDs is entering/modifying metadata in an organized, consistent manner. I have found metadata for classical music to be generally more complex than other genre, and I had to develop my own protocol for the metadata's structure due to this complexity. Access to the music is only as good as the metadata you provide. I think having multiple individuals entering data could be problematic in the long run.

 

All the best! It's a big job, but I think worth the effort.

Jim

 

Harlan Howard's definition of a great country song: "Three chords and the truth."

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I have found metadata for classical music to be generally more complex than other genre, and I had to develop my own protocol for the metadata's structure due to this complexity.

TRUTH! What is your protocol?

 

 

In my intel macpro I have a Sony OptiArc AD-5280S-CB-ROBOT drive for writing (this is VinPower Digital version with special FW, intended actually for working in Duplicator Towers 24/7) and LiteOn for reading and scanning duties.

 

 

Now pricing out a dedicated machine for this, looking at a refurbed HP Core2Duo/1.8 with 3 5.25" bays for optical, best case scenario <$50 per drive, what optical drive would you recommend? Lite-on?

 

Could automate dbpoweramp on it - considering dropping a 4TB internal in there, and moving to a 4TB backup external at the end of the project... thoughts?

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In such price range, I say price don't matter, only quality. 5280S costs little more than 50$, http://www.amazon.co.uk/Optiarc-5280S-CB-ROBOT-Duplication-Autoloader-Extension/dp/B00CB28OPS/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1392906183&sr=8-1&keywords=5280S-CB-ROBOT#productDetails

and for reading yes, LiteOn.

 

Plextor Premium drives are very good drives, but Plextor not producing this long time anymore. The newest Plexor's are rebagged drives from benq, LiteOn, Optiarc etc. I have two Premiums in spare, I rated writing speed to 4x and reading speed to 8x in their firmware. I use Premium only rare cases.

Sometimes in eBay we can found some rare Plextor drives in original sealed box...

Sorry, english is not my native language.

Fools and fanatics are always certain of themselves, but wiser people are full of doubts.

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TRUTH! What is your protocol?

You may want to read this thread on tagging classical music. The amount of time I spend curating my classical music collection is just way to high, but then again, once done well, it will serve you forever.

 

http://www.computeraudiophile.com/f11-software/managing-classical-music-metadata-itunes-experiences-17856/

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You may want to read this thread on tagging classical music. The amount of time I spend curating my classical music collection is just way to high, but then again, once done well, it will serve you forever.

 

http://www.computeraudiophile.com/f11-software/managing-classical-music-metadata-itunes-experiences-17856/

+1

Jim

 

Harlan Howard's definition of a great country song: "Three chords and the truth."

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  • 2 weeks later...

Musicophile's link is a great primer. However, you really need to decide how you want your player to organize your music the way you think. Execution becomes easy once you have done the planning and with over 1,000 CDs you would be well off to rip 50 to 100 on your own in order to figure out what you want.

 

I have had a ripping party, in fact I've had several (due to time limitations). Rock, pop, and most jazz practically tags itself, particularly using dBPowerAmp. So let the drunkards do the monkey ripping while you focus on the tough stuff. Now if 90% of that collection is classical then you have a different situation.

Analog: Koetsu Rosewood > VPI Aries 3 w/SDS > EAR 834P > EAR 834L: Audiodesk cleaner

Digital Fun: DAS > CAPS v3 w/LPS (JRMC) SOtM USB > Lynx Hilo > EAR 834L

Digital Serious: DAS > CAPS v3 w/LPS (HQPlayer) Ethernet > SMS-100 NAA > Lampi DSD L4 G5 > EAR 834L

Digital Disc: Oppo BDP 95 > EAR 834L

Output: EAR 834L > Xilica XP4080 DSP > Odessey Stratos Mono Extreme > Legacy Aeris

Phones: EAR 834L > Little Dot Mk ii > Senheiser HD 800

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Here's an update, I purchased a Kodak KDK 1000 on eBay and an HP DC7700 Core2Duo XP PC, got them all connected and running - it is pretty sweet! It can really do a 50 disc stack set and forget!

My questions now, are what kind of drive should I put in there to rip to, and what USB backup should I buy?

The computer has space for +1 SATA 2 drive, I am looking at ones designed for NAS applications, and my calculations say 1-2TB should be sufficient. Any recommendations?

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Here's an update, I purchased a Kodak KDK 1000 on eBay and an HP DC7700 Core2Duo XP PC, got them all connected and running - it is pretty sweet! It can really do a 50 disc stack set and forget!

My questions now, are what kind of drive should I put in there to rip to, and what USB backup should I buy?

The computer has space for +1 SATA 2 drive, I am looking at ones designed for NAS applications, and my calculations say 1-2TB should be sufficient. Any recommendations?

 

Tip: Calculate what you have now, by all means, then double the amount of space.

 

Type of drive : Just for reliability long term, any enterprise rated (24/7) drive. The effort of ripping does not need to repeated in a hurry. Any drive will fail, so it's important to keep backups, preferably two locations of the same data. I have had good results with Hitachi drives.

 

Tip : Do not use a NAS raid. Why not? If the NAS disc controller fails, your data is gone, since it cannot be accessed by another computer. Your only chance is to buy a controller or a NAS that matches the one that's failed exactly.

 

Format the drives according a standard operating system file system, so in case the controller fails, the data is on a native language that often is transportable across OS, for example NTFS can be read by OSX.

 

Avoid any portable drives for long term continuous use, they are not designed for this duty. Seagate, WD, all have failed miserably. The drives pulled out of them work fine, it's the controllers that foul up. I have yet to find a portable drive that keeps the heat under control, and stops cooking the drives for 24/7 use. An old clunker PC is capable of providing enough air flow around a hard drive, or better still if you can source a server or workstation shell, their airflow can keep drives cool very well indeed.

 

Awesome find on the Kodak KDK1000, well done!

AS Profile Equipment List        Say NO to MQA

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  • 7 months later...

I think you all should keep it to save these for the next generations. The technology is out here to support and we should make use of it.

I have had many (more than 300s) CDs and Cassettes. But all lost or damaged due to my constant shifting in the last 20 years.

I still dont do because I know I am not going to get back all the albums.

I wish if I could buy all music complied readymade in hard drives ? Its a big wish which is going to remain unfullfilled due to cost and copyright violations?

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  • 1 month later...

I go back and forth on Seagate v. WD drives. Having better luck with WD lately. Any WD "enterprise" class HD should do the job. Same for USB backup drive.

 

All hard drives will fail eventually. Consider using a "cloud" backup such as Crashplan in addition to your USB backup.

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For what it's worth, I always keep 4 versions of ALL my music: it's sitting on 1) a Synology NAS for daily use, which is 2) backed up monthly on a WD external "traditional drive" transported in a locked compartment at my workplace, as well as 3) a simple WD portable SSD, and finally 4) all of it on a Dropbox 1TB cloud storage.

It does cost something but it buys you peace of mind...

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