Jump to content
IGNORED

Windows Server 2012 - Hard Disk problem


Recommended Posts

Hello all

 

I need help !!!

 

I have a Lenovo TS140 ThinkServer running Windows 2012 R2 Essentials. I am intending to use as UPNP server (using Asset) and also using it to serve movies. The primary drive is a 500gb WD Black drive which has the OS, MyMovies, AnyDVD HD, Asset and a few other bits and pieces. Over the weekend I installed a Acronova Nimbie blu-ray stacker which I want to use to load all my DVDs and Blu-Ray discs. I have also installed a WD RED 6tb drive for storing the movies etc. (I will need more but it is a start). I have ripped a number of blu-ray discs and a few DVDs and after a few teething problems getting all the software working all was working well. Then the system just started to hang mid way through ripping a disc, so I restarted the server (which means powering it off, as shutting down just hang the system). Tried again with the same disc and had the same problem, so I tried another disc and had exactly the same problem again. Anyone any suggestions? I suspect it is something to do with the setup of the WD RED disk, there seems to be exactly 2tb of data on the disk (and I am aware that there are issues with primary drives being over 2tb).

 

Any help would be greatly appreciated.

 

Paul

Stereo Source: Auralic Aries + Mytek Brooklyn DAC+

Surround Source: Windows PC

Pre-amp: Mark Levinson ML380s, Anthem D2v

Speakers: ATC SCM50A (L/R/C), C4 (Sub), SCM20-2A (LR,RR)

Link to comment
there seems to be exactly 2tb of data on the disk

 

Without you saying that I would have suggested it in the first place;

 

These modern disks (4K cluster internally formatted) require a driver. As far as I have seen, this driver is available by standard in Windows these days, BUT you need to pay attention to your workflow at first usage of them. If you don't do that you're lost forever, or it requires so much trial and error that you rather buy a new one.

 

When the disk is new and put into the system, there's a small rather unknown sort of balloon in the middle of the screen that tells you to reboot. In my experience this balloon goes so unnoticed that the least you will think is "what the heck was that ?" and you avoid it (goes away by clicking somewhere else as I recall).

So apply that reboot when you see it.

 

After that the disk is recognized in well fashion and you can go ahead with Disk Manager and partition and format it.

 

The problem with this when you don't do this as supposed, is that you will never notice until you run into problems. So first thing to focus on would indeed be that 2TB limit BUT which won't show any anomalies (looks like 2.3TB etc. after just filling it up) until you reboot. Then its down to 2TB and obviously the remainder is lost.

 

Do notice that these disks officially come with a driver or other means of program (to be downloaded) and that it well can be that you need that because the driver is NOT available in Windows. I never used such program because it wasn't necessary for my system (which is a W7 Ultimate).

 

If it is wrong now for those disks, as said, repairing it is so tedious that you can also decide to put 2TB partitions on them. That works without hassle. However, if you first tried to mangle with them for repair, chance is fair even that won't succeed any more (Disk Manager just won't show the available space).

 

All over vague, but I hope this helps you.

Peter

Lush^3-e      Lush^2      Blaxius^2      Ethernet^2     HDMI^2     XLR^2

XXHighEnd (developer)

Phasure NOS1 24/768 Async USB DAC (manufacturer)

Phasure Mach III Audio PC with Linear PSU (manufacturer)

Orelino & Orelo MKII Speakers (designer/supplier)

Link to comment
Without you saying that I would have suggested it in the first place;

 

These modern disks (4K cluster internally formatted) require a driver. As far as I have seen, this driver is available by standard in Windows these days, BUT you need to pay attention to your workflow at first usage of them. If you don't do that you're lost forever, or it requires so much trial and error that you rather buy a new one.

 

When the disk is new and put into the system, there's a small rather unknown sort of balloon in the middle of the screen that tells you to reboot. In my experience this balloon goes so unnoticed that the least you will think is "what the heck was that ?" and you avoid it (goes away by clicking somewhere else as I recall).

So apply that reboot when you see it.

 

After that the disk is recognized in well fashion and you can go ahead with Disk Manager and partition and format it.

 

The problem with this when you don't do this as supposed, is that you will never notice until you run into problems. So first thing to focus on would indeed be that 2TB limit BUT which won't show any anomalies (looks like 2.3TB etc. after just filling it up) until you reboot. Then its down to 2TB and obviously the remainder is lost.

 

Do notice that these disks officially come with a driver or other means of program (to be downloaded) and that it well can be that you need that because the driver is NOT available in Windows. I never used such program because it wasn't necessary for my system (which is a W7 Ultimate).

 

If it is wrong now for those disks, as said, repairing it is so tedious that you can also decide to put 2TB partitions on them. That works without hassle. However, if you first tried to mangle with them for repair, chance is fair even that won't succeed any more (Disk Manager just won't show the available space).

 

All over vague, but I hope this helps you.

Peter

 

Thanks for your pointers.

 

Having done a bit more reading it looks like the issue is likely to be that the disk was originally installed on a Windows 7 machine (32 bit) - looks like a bit more playing on the Windows Server machine to persuade it to be a 6TB drive.... (obviously I'll need to off load the data to another machine in the meantime).

 

Paul

Stereo Source: Auralic Aries + Mytek Brooklyn DAC+

Surround Source: Windows PC

Pre-amp: Mark Levinson ML380s, Anthem D2v

Speakers: ATC SCM50A (L/R/C), C4 (Sub), SCM20-2A (LR,RR)

Link to comment
Thanks for your pointers.

 

Having done a bit more reading it looks like the issue is likely to be that the disk was originally installed on a Windows 7 machine (32 bit) - looks like a bit more playing on the Windows Server machine to persuade it to be a 6TB drive.... (obviously I'll need to off load the data to another machine in the meantime).

 

Paul

 

Peter

 

I think I have now resolved the issue. I used WD Acronis True Image to resolve the problem, unfortunately the free version can not be used on the Server - the software checks and tells you to use the server version (and gives you a phone number to call and buy it!). So I had to install it on another machine, fortunately I have another PC running a 64 bit version of Windows 8.1 Pro. I am in the process of re-ripping the blu ray discs but hopefully this time all will be well - the software did show that it was in effect a 2tb drive. Ripped just over 1tb of discs yesterday and left it running today, so should get over the 2TB size sometime later today!

 

Thanks for your help

 

Paul

Stereo Source: Auralic Aries + Mytek Brooklyn DAC+

Surround Source: Windows PC

Pre-amp: Mark Levinson ML380s, Anthem D2v

Speakers: ATC SCM50A (L/R/C), C4 (Sub), SCM20-2A (LR,RR)

Link to comment
Thank you for your feedback Paul.

 

Peter

 

Hi Peter

 

Just thought I would update you. It still doesn't work but at least I now know why. Usefully, this machine only supports drives upto 4tb which is not very helpful but at least I know why it doesn't work. It also does not appear that there are any plans to update whatever is necessary to remove this restriction.

 

In the meantime thanks for your help.

 

Paul

Stereo Source: Auralic Aries + Mytek Brooklyn DAC+

Surround Source: Windows PC

Pre-amp: Mark Levinson ML380s, Anthem D2v

Speakers: ATC SCM50A (L/R/C), C4 (Sub), SCM20-2A (LR,RR)

Link to comment

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now


×
×
  • Create New...