Jump to content
IGNORED

Two-bay or four-bay Synology NAS


Recommended Posts

I have three to four Macs on my home network. My Mini is a dedicated music server. The two iMacs are for work and personal use. I use external enclosures (two single bay and one dual-bay RAID) to back up files. I'm weighing whether to stick with this point strategies or go with a central NAS. Opinions? For the NAS approach, I'm considering Synology (DS214play with JBOD or DS414 with SHR). Thoughts? I recognize that I would also need to back up the NAS to keep the data safe®.

Link to comment
I recognize that I would also need to back up the NAS to keep the data safe®.

 

Very important, and I would remove the ®. Redundancy and backup are not the same thing.

"Relax, it's only hi-fi. There's never been a hi-fi emergency." - Roy Hall

"Not everything that can be counted counts, and not everything that counts can be counted." - William Bruce Cameron

 

Link to comment

The answer to your question depends almost entirely on how much storage you are likely to need. As a conservative guidline I'd suggest 3 times your current storage requirement. Allowing for RAID taking an extra 25% how many 3 (or 4) TB discs will you need?

If you can do this with 2 then that's the way to go otherwise a 4bay.

ALAC iTunes library on Synology DS412+ running MinimServer with Samsung Galaxy Tab S2 tablet running BubbleUPnP for control >

Hi-Fi 1: Airport Extreme bridge > Netgear switch > TP-Link optical isolation > dCS Network Bridge AND PS Audio PerfectWave Transport > PS Audio DirectStream DAC with Bridge Mk.II > Primare A60 > Harbeth SHL5plus Anniversary Edition .

Hi-Fi 2: Sonore Rendu > Chord Hugo DAC/preamp > LFD integrated > Harbeth P3ESRs and > Sennheiser HD800

Link to comment

Well, the one with four disks can provide more storage space. And should be faster—but through the network you'll likely not notice.

 

The one with two disks is cheaper. And there is the added advantage that if you set it up as mirror, you can add a third disk to rotate the disks and store one off-premise just in case something ever goes very wrong.

 

I think at the end the day it comes down to how much space you really need.

Link to comment

I will try the 3X rule and then the Synology configuration tool. I'm also thinking that I don't want to go overboard on the storage since these devices don't last forever. I've owned a number external enclosures, and the boards always seem to crap out eventually. Something that would last three to five years is probably acceptable. Of course, drives nowadays often seem to die after just a year or two of use.

Link to comment
And there is the added advantage that if you set it up as mirror, you can add a third disk to rotate the disks and store one off-premise just in case something ever goes very wrong.

 

Say more about this. I have a 2-bay Synology and have thought this would be a simple backup solution. Is it that simple? Just rotate one out every few days?

 

How does it work when the data changes? Can one "restore" from the third disk?

 

Thanks in advance.

Link to comment

In a mirror, any of the disks contains all the data so you can always recover from that. When you remove a disk, the RAID is degraded but it works—that's what it's designed for after all.

 

So you remove a disk, put another in place and add it to the volume. The NAS will restore the redundancy by copying the data from the working drive to the new one.

Link to comment

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now


×
×
  • Create New...