Jump to content
IGNORED

CD skipping problem


Heisenberg

Recommended Posts

Hey everyone,

I recently bought a used CD that plays fine, except one track, that "skips" for a few seconds when I play the CD in my car. I tried to import the CD into iTunes to see if it still had the same problem, but I noticed that the track that skipped in my car plays totally fine when imported. Why is this? Is it because of the CD or my car's player? Thanks.

Link to comment

Ripping a CD can take as long as it requires to get a good copy of the audio tracks, since it is extracting data rather than playing audio in real-time.

 

iTunes is not a secure ripper, so there may still be occasional pops & clicks in a disc which skips, but using a secure ripping tool like dBpoweramp or XLD on a Mac should get you a perfect rip if it's possible.

 

If you were simply playing the disc in iTunes without ripping it, then it sounds like the car's CD player isn't working well.

 

This is why I no longer use CD players. I rip the disc once and have a copy which always plays perfectly every time.

Link to comment

Try cleaning the cd. You can use a cd cleaner or just try some mild detergent and water using a soft cloth. Look at the cd and see if you can detect any physical imperfections. If you see some a cleaner that buffs the cd surface might help. I've used one in the past with good results and have been able to play discs that were unplayable. I think the unit was called Disc Doctor or Skip Doctor.

Link to comment

Basically because a computer can take its time and repeatedly re-read a CD till it's sure it has read it right it is a lot more immune to slight damage on CDs compared with a traditional playback mechanism. This is especially true with players such as a car player which is likely build to a low cost.

 

For analogy think of a badly printed newspaper where the text is blurred... If you are reading the article aloud you are more likely to make errors than if you were to be writing a copy of the article and it is possible to keep rereading and checking the context of the words, etc.

 

Eloise

Eloise

---

...in my opinion / experience...

While I agree "Everything may matter" working out what actually affects the sound is a trickier thing.

And I agree "Trust your ears" but equally don't allow them to fool you - trust them with a bit of skepticism.

keep your mind open... But mind your brain doesn't fall out.

Link to comment

Right, so basically when a CD is being ripped, the method is different from the one used for simple playback, correct? I guess that's why I'm experiencing some skipping in my car and not when ripping. Thanks for the explanations.

I'll try cleaning the CD, and if the problem persists I'll just burn it to another since I've already got it in ALAC.

 

About ripping, I'll try doing it with the program you suggested, thanks.

Link to comment
This is especially true with players such as a car player which is likely build to a low cost.

 

The original car CD players were actually built to a higher standard due to the need to make them immune to bumps etc. on the road. However a car CD player that is old may have degraded, or even have grime on the lens.

 

How a Digital Audio file sounds, or a Digital Video file looks, is governed to a large extent by the Power Supply area. All that Identical Checksums gives is the possibility of REGENERATING the file to close to that of the original file.

PROFILE UPDATED 13-11-2020

Link to comment

Even a good car CD player has the restriction of having to read the file in real-time, whereas a computer ripping a CD can take all day until it gets it right (or consistent). Polishing with a microfiber or cotton cloth and a little water can work wonders, but if you know the ALAC files are ok, then it would be easiest to burn a replacement CD.

Link to comment
If the CD rips without issue, import the tracks as lossless and burn them to a new CD.

 

This may be worth trying, but there is no guarantee of success as many earlier CD players had difficulty reading CD-Rs.

 

How a Digital Audio file sounds, or a Digital Video file looks, is governed to a large extent by the Power Supply area. All that Identical Checksums gives is the possibility of REGENERATING the file to close to that of the original file.

PROFILE UPDATED 13-11-2020

Link to comment
Even a good car CD player has the restriction of having to read the file in real-time, whereas a computer ripping a CD can take all day until it gets it right (or consistent). Polishing with a microfiber or cotton cloth and a little water can work wonders, but if you know the ALAC files are ok, then it would be easiest to burn a replacement CD.

 

The ALAC files are definitely ok, I've checked them all.

Link to comment

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now


×
×
  • Create New...