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Room acoustics. Positioning speakers on a diagonal, rather than conventional placement


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Hi Flavio,

 

I'm not so sure Roger went to that show with that particular placement in mind. (I would tend to doubt he was looking forward to placing a speaker right next to the wall.) Usually at shows, the person setting up makes the best of a not-so-good situation.

 

With regard to trying things out, indeed, we agree! That is what I always suggest above all else: that folks try things out for themselves and draw their own conclusions. ;-}

 

Best regards,

Barry

Soundkeeper Recordings

http://www.soundkeeperrecordings.wordpress.colm

Barry Diament Audio

 

Hi Barry :)

 

you can bet that Roger had that particular placement in mind, the specific distance from the wall is not important as it can be dictated by the size of the room... what he was trying to do is to avoid the two Transmission Line woofers reinforcing (and canceling) the same exact frequencies.

But you don't have to believe my words... you can ask him here: Sanders Sound Systems - Contact Us

 

Ciao, Flavio

Warning: My posts may be biased even if in good faith, I work for Dirac Research :-)

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Hi Flavio,

 

I'll let you make that particular bet. ;-}

 

I think distance from the wall is critical myself. Aside from its effects in the treble (to tonality, imaging, soundstage, etc.), I would ask: who cares if the frequencies stimulated in the bass are different when at least one group of frequencies is being excessively stimulated? All it does is re-arrange where the problem is, rather than diminish (or remove) the problem.

 

But I understand you have a different view.

Where we agree is that as always, folks should try different approaches to see what works for them.

Cheers!

 

Best regards,

Barry

Soundkeeper Recordings

The Soundkeeper | Audio, Music, Recording, Playback

Barry Diament Audio

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Fine Barry,

we have both explained the reasoning behind our points of view so I leave you the last word :)

 

Ciao, Flavio

Warning: My posts may be biased even if in good faith, I work for Dirac Research :-)

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Fine Barry,

we have both explained the reasoning behind our points of view so I leave you the last word :)

 

Ciao, Flavio

 

Hi Flavio,

 

In that case, I'll say, however you choose to listen to your music:

 

Enjoy!

 

Best regards,

Barry

Soundkeeper Recordings

The Soundkeeper | Audio, Music, Recording, Playback

Barry Diament Audio

 

And in the end, the enjoyment of music you take is equal to the enjoyment of music you make. The Beatles might have written it other than in my paraphrase?

 

Best,

Richard

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  • 2 years later...

[h=1]I know it's been over 2 years since the last response to this thread, but just yesterday I stumbled on, "HOW TO SET UP A DEDICATED LISTENING ROOM WITHOUT FANCY TREATMENTS." I was so intrigued I rearranged my system and room right away and was very happy with the increased depth and width of the soundstage. Today I came across this thread and read the recommended articles, "Setting up your monitoring environment," and "Vibration control for better performance." Thing is I also have my home theater in the same space as my stereo setup. I've read that the TV and other (unused) speakers can interfere with the stereo setup's performance. Soon I'll have a bedroom that I could use as a dedicated music room but it only measures 12 x 10 feet. Along the back long wall is a single window the opposite long wall has the entrance door with a 3 x 3 foot alcove and the closet with double sliding wood doors. Both short walls are totally solid. I'd like to know from those with experience if this room is too small before lugging an 80 pound power amp in. My speakers are monitor audio Gold 300 and an SVS PC-2000 subwoofer. The other option is to keep everything were it is now, (which would be more convenient for music listening while doing other household chores) and adding a power conditioner and air bearings and straightening out the jumble of cords in back of the rack.[/h]

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I know it's been over 2 years since the last response to this thread, but just yesterday I stumbled on, "HOW TO SET UP A DEDICATED LISTENING ROOM WITHOUT FANCY TREATMENTS." I was so intrigued I rearranged my system and room right away and was very happy with the increased depth and width of the soundstage. Today I came across this thread and read the recommended articles, "Setting up your monitoring environment," and "Vibration control for better performance." Thing is I also have my home theater in the same space as my stereo setup. I've read that the TV and other (unused) speakers can interfere with the stereo setup's performance. Soon I'll have a bedroom that I could use as a dedicated music room but it only measures 12 x 10 feet. Along the back long wall is a single window the opposite long wall has the entrance door with a 3 x 3 foot alcove and the closet with double sliding wood doors. Both short walls are totally solid. I'd like to know from those with experience if this room is too small before lugging an 80 pound power amp in. My speakers are monitor audio Gold 300 and an SVS PC-2000 subwoofer. The other option is to keep everything were it is now, (which would be more convenient for music listening while doing other household chores) and adding a power conditioner and air bearings and straightening out the jumble of cords in back of the rack.

 

My guess is that the room would be smaller than is optimall. It's also close to being a perfect square in width and length which is not good for room modes. Some type of room correction could help. The problem is that because of the size of the room, it will limit seating and speaker placement positions. As you know, this can have a great effect on room acoustics. With all of this said, I have seen guys make a room this size work. I can't imagine it working well however without some good room correction.

 

Unused speakers or other boxes with holes in them like instruments can interfere with good room acoustics. In the future, technology like Dirac Unison will seek to use others speakers to assist the performance of the speaker playing audio. As for your TV, perhaps you can find a throw or blanket to put over the TV when listening to help reduce reflections. You can try this to see how much of an effect it is having. Placing the speakers further out into the room away from the TV can also reduce the problem.

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