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Synology DS414slim Announced


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Hey guys Synology has updated its slim NAS device. I have the DS411slim and love it. Looks like this is a nice upgrade.

 

 

 

Synology® Announces a Refresh to it’s Smallest Form-Factor DiskStation DS414slim

 

Bellevue, Washington—March 27, 2014—Synology America Corp is pleased to announce the refresh of one of its most eye-catching DiskStations, the DS414slim. The slim is the smallest four-bay NAS to features the award winning DiskStation Manager 5.0 operating system (DSM 5.0). Using 2.5” drives, the DS414slim can max-out at 6TBs of raw storage; making it an ideal solution for home media enthusiasts and small office work groups needing versatile advanced storage, with a small footprint.

 

Advanced storage, tiny box: The DS414slim is small enough to fit on the palm of a hand, yet powerful enough for workgroups in businesses, with the ability to serve up to 128 active connections. The unit now includes an FPU, and twice as much RAM as its predecessor, improving overall performance in multitasking, and media processing. Most significantly, the DS414slim utilizes DSM 5.0 with its rich and extensible array of features including: media streaming, web hosting, timed backups, and photo management.

 

Quick and easy access to data: DSM 5.0’s integrated QuickConnect feature, makes it possible to access assets on the DS414slim without having to contend with router configurations. It provides easy access on Synology’s diverse selection of Android, iOS, and Windows Phone applications, as well as any contemporary browser. With QuickConnect, it’s always easy to get content locally, or on the move.

 

Private cloud in the palm of your hand: Included in DSM’s Package Center is Cloud Station. At no additional cost, users can access and sync: files, file-type or folder no matter where they are, or what device they are working on.

 

Other notable features:

 

• Dual gigabit LAN ports with failover support

• Two USB 3.0 ports for additional external storage

• Up to 2048 user accounts, and 256 user groups

“The DS414slim is really an impressive piece of tech, said Thadd Weil, Public Relations Manager at Synology America. “From the offset, you wouldn’t believe such a small device was actually a server. With DSM 5.0 to bring its components to life, the slim is a fantastic solution for businesses, creative teams, and home enthusiasts looking for compact network attached storage.”

 

 

Availability

The DS414slim is now available globally, and will be available in the United States mid-June with an MSRP of $299.99.

 

For more information visit, Synology - Network Attached Storage (NAS)

Founder of Audiophile Style

UPDATED: My Audio Systems -> https://audiophile.style/system

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Chris.. this looks like the NAS that I have been looking to add to my system.. but still confused by all the software offerings that Synology has to offer on these models.... If I am primarily looking for music storage ( and having those files available to all my music devices) and backup of the several PC's we have ..Do the other software packages come with the device or is there a cost for each one ... and if so,, what would you recommend that I get..

 

Thanks for looking at this for me.. enjoy your site and everyone's thoughts so hoping I can get some clarity to this decision

 

Don J

Man cave Denon 3312ci, Oppo 93, Windows 7 PC, GoldenEar 5.1 Speakers[br]Office Onkyo 797,Sony Sacd Player,Windows 7 PC,PSB Speakers, Sonore SoTM SMS 100, Schiit Magni and Modi, PSB headphones[br]Living Rm Denon 2309ci, Sony 3D Bluray, Pioneer Sacd player, PSB speakers, WD Live Meadia Player[br]Two other rooms with Directv receivers that allow music from PC server setup to TV speakers (at this time)

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The Synology boxes use their DSM software which is great and has all the advertised software included. If you look at the link above and click on specifications and scroll to the bottom you will see all the software included.

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The Synology slim versions are the quietists conventional NAS drives I've used.

With that answer you must be a politician Chris...

Eloise

---

...in my opinion / experience...

While I agree "Everything may matter" working out what actually affects the sound is a trickier thing.

And I agree "Trust your ears" but equally don't allow them to fool you - trust them with a bit of skepticism.

keep your mind open... But mind your brain doesn't fall out.

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Info directly from Synology

 

Synology - Network Attached Storage (NAS)

 

[TABLE=class: compare_spec_table, width: 100%]

[TR]

[TD=class: td_level_2]Noise Level[/TD]

[TD]21.8 dB(A) [/TD]

[/TR]

[/TABLE]

 


    [*=left]Noise Level Testing Environment: Fully loaded with Seagate 500GB ST9500325AS hard drive(s) in idle; Two G.R.A.S. Type 40AE microphones, each set up at 1 meter away from the Synology NAS front and rear; Background noise: 17.2 dB(A); Temperature: 23.6˚C; Humidity: 58.2%.

Founder of Audiophile Style

UPDATED: My Audio Systems -> https://audiophile.style/system

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The only quieter NAS drives are fanless SSD units and fanless HDD units. I consider these more unconventional.

I was just being mean Chris...

 

All in good humour I hope.

Eloise

---

...in my opinion / experience...

While I agree "Everything may matter" working out what actually affects the sound is a trickier thing.

And I agree "Trust your ears" but equally don't allow them to fool you - trust them with a bit of skepticism.

keep your mind open... But mind your brain doesn't fall out.

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21.8 db is effectively silent in almost any kind of room. Few listening environments have ambient db level below 30, and even fewer below say, 25db. So 21.8 is quite a bit quieter than that.

Main listening (small home office):

Main setup: Surge protector +_iFi  AC iPurifiers >Isol-8 Mini sub Axis Power Conditioning+Isolation>QuietPC Low Noise Server>Roon (Audiolense DRC)>Stack Audio Link II>Kii Control>Kii Three >GIK Room Treatments.

Secondary Listening: Server with Audiolense RC>RPi4 or analog>Matrix Element i Streamer/DAC (XLR)+Schiit Freya>Kii Three .

Bedroom: SBTouch to Cambridge Soundworks Desktop Setup.
Living Room/Kitchen: Ropieee (RPi3b+ with touchscreen) + Schiit Modi3E to a pair of Morel Hogtalare. 

All absolute statements about audio are false :)

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Thanks to all regarding the quietness of the unit. Sounds like this should be my first NAS on which to store the music collection I need to rip. I've also read several comments that the smaller 2.5 inch drives, as used in this model have significantly greater long term reliability.

 

JC

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Thanks to all regarding the quietness of the unit. Sounds like this should be my first NAS on which to store the music collection I need to rip. I've also read several comments that the smaller 2.5 inch drives, as used in this model have significantly greater long term reliability.

 

JC

 

Actually, that has NOT been my experience. Now that WD has released their 2.5" red drives, maybe things have changed. However, with my 411 slim I have had to replace two drives in two years, and have never had to replace any in my bigger NAS.

 

I have to disagree with Chris on this one. IMHO, unless the size is really a factor, the DS412+ is a better alternative. It is quieter rated at 19.3dB(A) as compared to 21.8 dB(A) for the new Slim, faster and runs much cooler AND will give you much more storage. I have replaced my Slim with this.

 

In order to try to preserve some $$, I will run my room at 76-77 degrees when I am not using it. My Slim would often shut down from overheating with fans running which I am sure led to the failure of two of my drives.

 

For Audio, particularly if one wants the quietest NAS in the audio room in combination with a high storage capability that is most reliable, the DS412+ is clearly the better choice IMO.

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Hi Chris, do you believe in, or hear fan-induced jitter, or other nasty stuff, vibration, etc that degrade sonic?

 

Some audiophiles are steadfast in using fan-less NAS or CAS, etc.

 

Nice NAS by the way.

Nope. I don't believe it for one second. Fanless is great for less noise but I see no possible way a NAS fan can induce and sonic degradation.

Founder of Audiophile Style

UPDATED: My Audio Systems -> https://audiophile.style/system

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I was eagerly awaiting the availability of the new version of the DS414 Slim so that I could purchase one. It seemed like the best option for my situation. However, I have just discovered that the Western Digital 2.5 inch Red hard drives, which are best for this application are not offered in any size larger than 1TB. I have a collection of 3000 cd's that need to be ripped and then stored on this NAS. I need at least a 2TB hard drives!

 

Product List

 

 

JC

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Tubelover. I located information from several sources online that a 1tb drive would accomodate 3000 cd's (in FLAC) without a problem. I only have about 2500 at present, but wanted to leave room for growth, and am going in that direction myself.

 

This looks like a very attractive NAS.

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  • 4 weeks later...

So I have just decided to purchase this NAS device and was looking for some help before it arrives on what are the best practices for using this device in a home setting.. Main uses for it will be storage of my music collection (approx. 400 GB so far) and being able to access it throughout the home using all the devices that can see the music and play it, storage of the thousands of pictures we have accumulated over the years (some digital , some to be converted to digital) and of course backup for our Windows pcs located throughout the house

 

General plan is to hook it up with gig Ethernet ( any one here have experience with dual Ethernet for failover or link aggregation??) on my centralized router and installing 4 WD RED Nas drives (1 TB capacity each).

 

Other than the basics ..looking for advice for music collection, backup strategies or anything else you have found to be useful

 

Thanks in advance for any and all advice

 

Don J

Man cave Denon 3312ci, Oppo 93, Windows 7 PC, GoldenEar 5.1 Speakers[br]Office Onkyo 797,Sony Sacd Player,Windows 7 PC,PSB Speakers, Sonore SoTM SMS 100, Schiit Magni and Modi, PSB headphones[br]Living Rm Denon 2309ci, Sony 3D Bluray, Pioneer Sacd player, PSB speakers, WD Live Meadia Player[br]Two other rooms with Directv receivers that allow music from PC server setup to TV speakers (at this time)

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  • 2 weeks later...

Hopefully someone can help clarify something for me. I'm simply not computer savvy. I am anxiously awaiting the delivery of my new Auralic Aries streamer and need to purchase a NAS device.

 

Due to my lack of knowledge, I'm recruiting the help of my friendly neighbourhood IT buddy, and here was his response when I showed him a link to the DS414 webpage:

 

"it uses laptop drives; which are not designed for RAID. Plus, they wear out a lot faster than desktop drives. You need a system that takes 3.5" instead of 2.5" drives. If you pick one out, and give me the capacity you want, I can select the drives for you. They need to be certified for RAID. I've seen several NAS arrays crash because the correct hard drives weren't used. That system is really just a budget system. I made the mistake of buying a budget NAS for my house a few years ago, and lost everything that was on it."

 

I wanted some feedback from people around here who might offer some perspective on what he told me. Perhaps he's right, or perhaps he's missing the mark based on the type of setup people around here are having success with. I genuinely don't really know what RAID even means. Any help is mucho appreciated.

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Hopefully someone can help clarify something for me. I'm simply not computer savvy. I am anxiously awaiting the delivery of my new Auralic Aries streamer and need to purchase a NAS device.

 

Due to my lack of knowledge, I'm recruiting the help of my friendly neighbourhood IT buddy, and here was his response when I showed him a link to the DS414 webpage:

 

"it uses laptop drives; which are not designed for RAID. Plus, they wear out a lot faster than desktop drives. You need a system that takes 3.5" instead of 2.5" drives. If you pick one out, and give me the capacity you want, I can select the drives for you. They need to be certified for RAID. I've seen several NAS arrays crash because the correct hard drives weren't used. That system is really just a budget system. I made the mistake of buying a budget NAS for my house a few years ago, and lost everything that was on it."

 

I wanted some feedback from people around here who might offer some perspective on what he told me. Perhaps he's right, or perhaps he's missing the mark based on the type of setup people around here are having success with. I genuinely don't really know what RAID even means. Any help is mucho appreciated.

There is continuum from worst to best with NAS solutions. You could spend a couple million dollars on a NAS in the enterprise arena or build one from a single board computer for $35 plus the cost of drives. Your friendly neighborhood IT buddy is correct in his assessment for the most part, but I'm willing to bet he doesn't have the experience that the combined CA community has with NAS units for music storage. No slight on him, it's just not possible to know as much as a collective group of people. Laptop drives will work just fine for your NAS. I have a DS411slim with laptop drives that works great and has been working great for years. I wouldn't worry about it if I were you. Laptop drives wearing out a lot faster than RAID approved drives, such as the WD Red Series, can be an issue, but I'm willing to bet you'll get a good three to four years out of the drives before you have a single issue. When you have an issue you can replace the bad drive and move on. The chances of more than one failing at once are really slim. RAID will protect you in the case of a single drive failure and can be setup to protect you from multiple drive failures if you have enough disks and storage space.

Founder of Audiophile Style

UPDATED: My Audio Systems -> https://audiophile.style/system

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I have the 713+ with 2*500GB SSD and it is absolutely NOT quiet.

The trouble is that the idle measurement really does not matter, because it is when the fan is running the noise is detectable (and this is not 21.5dB!). The measurement should be done worst case. The fan actually runs quite often and sometimes for a prolonged time which is annoying. Despite shorter read times I see no point investing in expensive SSD's due to the noise aspect if the NAS has a fan. If it is convection cooled then it is something else.

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There is continuum from worst to best with NAS solutions. You could spend a couple million dollars on a NAS in the enterprise arena or build one from a single board computer for $35 plus the cost of drives. Your friendly neighborhood IT buddy is correct in his assessment for the most part, but I'm willing to bet he doesn't have the experience that the combined CA community has with NAS units for music storage. No slight on him, it's just not possible to know as much as a collective group of people. Laptop drives will work just fine for your NAS. I have a DS411slim with laptop drives that works great and has been working great for years. I wouldn't worry about it if I were you. Laptop drives wearing out a lot faster than RAID approved drives, such as the WD Red Series, can be an issue, but I'm willing to bet you'll get a good three to four years out of the drives before you have a single issue. When you have an issue you can replace the bad drive and move on. The chances of more than one failing at once are really slim. RAID will protect you in the case of a single drive failure and can be setup to protect you from multiple drive failures if you have enough disks and storage space.

 

Chris, thanks so much for taking the time to give me a clear answer with the general perspective that I was hoping for. Have a great weekend!

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Re the use of laptop drives...

 

A lot of high end servers (from Dell, HP, etc) now use 2.5" drives and these are designed for much higher usage than a typical NAS at home will get.

 

Eloise

Eloise

---

...in my opinion / experience...

While I agree "Everything may matter" working out what actually affects the sound is a trickier thing.

And I agree "Trust your ears" but equally don't allow them to fool you - trust them with a bit of skepticism.

keep your mind open... But mind your brain doesn't fall out.

Link to comment

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