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Overly Lengthy Rip Times


Mister Wednesday
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Hello all,

 

Today's question is about a small handful of CDs (probably less than 5 so far out of approximately 2800) that have required rip times of 1 hour or more compared to my normal CD rip time of 3-4 minutes (using iTunes). In these isolated instances you can hear the optical disk drive starting and stopping continuously during the extended rip period as if it's encountering disc errors throughout the entire length of the disc (as opposed to a fast, smooth, continuous drive noise when it's doing its regular thing).

 

I'm wondering if anyone else out there has encountered a similar situation with any of your own CDs you're ripping and if you know the reason why?. When viewing the discs that are having this problem there doesn't appear to be any visible damage to the plastic disc surface or the silver data layer. And these are all factory manufactured discs (not CDRs) from major labels. The rips in these cases always do eventually successfully complete but it takes this inordinately long period of time to complete.

 

Any thoughts?

 

Regards to all,

 

Mister Wednesday

 

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I've run into this a few times. I even have a few CDs that won't rip on my MacBook Pro, but successfully rip on my MacBook. The cause is usually a damaged disc. It's also possible the discs don't meet the Compact Disc standard. Are these DualDiscs or to they have content other than music as well?

 

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In circumstances like this ... it's possibly worth recommending you look at trying XLD or MAX (assuming MacOS) or EAC or dbPowerAmp (on PC) as these will give some feedback as to how well the CD has ripped unlike iTunes - this is iTunes downfall in that if it has problems reading a disc you get no real feedback as to if it was successful in the end.

 

Eloise

 

Eloise

---

...in my opinion / experience...

While I agree "Everything may matter" working out what actually affects the sound is a trickier thing.

And I agree "Trust your ears" but equally don't allow them to fool you - trust them with a bit of skepticism.

keep your mind open... But mind your brain doesn't fall out.

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Chris,

 

The CDs in question are all straight audio-only CDs from major labels that are Compact Disc standard discs - all of them play perfectly on my CD player (a Linn Unidisk 1.1) but have exhibited this problem when I've ripped them to my hard drive.

 

As I said, less than a handful encountered so far, but it's annoying more than anything else as I can't stop the rip once it's started using iTunes. And they do eventually successfully get ripped to my hard drive after 1 hour +!

 

Regards,

 

Mister Wednesday

 

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audio_ELF,

 

Yes, when I first started down this computer-based music system road I did consider using MAX (I'm using a MacBook Pro) but, as I'm new to this whole thing, I decided to stick with the factory standard iTunes software.

 

Does MAX software give you some sort of summary report at the end of each rip letting you know about any errors? And does it allow you to back out of a rip part-way through if you start encountering problems. Actually, does backing out of a rip, if you could, cause any problems in your iTunes library? - I'm assuming it might as the reason why iTunes doesn't let you manually do this until the software itself rejects a rip itself.

 

Regards,

 

Mister Wednesday

 

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