Jump to content
IGNORED

Powerline noise affecting computer audio, seeking solution.


Recommended Posts

Since installing powerline networking I am experiencing significant interference and ticking when listening to my Laptop Audio. The same noise occurs through both the analog headphone port (which is amplified) and through my usb soundcard (which has amplified headphone port).

 

The same noise occurs when the laptop is plugged into every outlet in my house, and disappers when the powerline network is unplugged. Unfortunatley I really need the powerline networking.

 

Wondering if anyone has experience trying to filter unwanted electrical noise from their audio system. I don't know much about this topic, but I'm aware that some people purchase "power conditioners" or filters for their home audio equipment.

 

From what I understand these types of devices may be able to filter noise. My surge protector and laptop power supply seem to have no ability to filter out the unwanted noise.

 

I was looking at this product and wondering if it might help.

Amazon.com: Apc Av C Type 2 Outlet Wall Mount Power Filter, 120V: Electronics

 

Thanks to anyone who has experience with this!

Link to comment

It looks to me like a "common mode" noise (from ground plug).

 

Zero Surge is an excellent product that I use to protect all the audio gear (including computers) from external spikes, since I live in the Rainforest where thunderstorms are very common. I don't think it would protect from internal noise.

 

For this kind of noise you need something like BPT Balanced Power Technologies - Home Since they are very expensive there should be less expensive units. Or, float the ground in some of your gear.

 

Roch

Link to comment

I don't think it would protect from internal noise.

Roch

The basic models will not but if the higher end models do. How much? I have no idea as I use other items for that. I use the Zero Surge on my server, router, printer though. Heck, I even have one on my treadmill and bed.

W10 NUC i7 (Gen 10) > Roon (Audiolense FIR) > Motu UltraLite mk5 > (4) Hypex NCore NC502MP > JBL M2 Master Reference +4 subs

 

Watch my Podcast https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCXMw_bZWBMtRWNJQfTJ38kA/videos

Link to comment

Thank you! I really appreciate this discussion. I'm looking into the Brick Wall product information now.

 

I may try to diagnose internal vs ground plug noise first by using a cheater plug which I see on sale for $0.79. That may help me decide which of these products to purchase next.

Link to comment

I had a CRT that I had been using as a computer monitor that put a rumble sound into my computer stereo system. The monitor was a very powerful Sony Trinitron monitor. When I unplugged the monitor, the rumble disappeared. It was not a "ticking" sound, but a low frequency around 600 Hz., if my memory serves me well. It polluted the whole house power system.

Link to comment

Unfortunately MOVs (Metal Oxide Varistors) are a joke, they are not faster enough to act on a surge. ZeroSurge uses a different much faster technology.

 

The BrickWall® filter is good but to isolate one device from the other, but not to connect 8 devices to his 8 outlets. It works at the same principle of an ISO transformer.

 

RF filters some times are good, but if not, you finish without low bass, since some of them filters 60hZ and bellow.

 

Please begin to try with a cheater plug, and/or, inverting the polarity of some of your gear, beginning with the powerline network. Powerline networks works riding over your home AC circuits, under RF!

 

It's an interesting a hard to solve problem... but please read this:

 

Smarthome 1626-10 FilterLinc 10-Amp Plug-In Noise Filter - Amazon.com

 

Roch

Link to comment
Unfortunately MOVs (Metal Oxide Varistors) are a joke, they are not faster enough to act on a surge. ZeroSurge uses a different much faster technology.

 

As do those others we first posted.

 

The BrickWall® filter is good but to isolate one device from the other, but not to connect 8 devices to his 8 outlets. It works at the same principle of an ISO transformer.

 

RF filters some times are good, but if not, you finish without low bass, since some of them filters 60hZ and bellow.

 

Well, I prefer to listen to the bass in my recordings, rather than those who inhabit the wall sockets.

 

Please begin to try with a cheater plug, and/or, inverting the polarity of some of your gear, beginning with the powerline network. Powerline networks works riding over your home AC circuits, under RF!

 

It's an interesting a hard to solve problem... but please read this:

 

Smarthome 1626-10 FilterLinc 10-Amp Plug-In Noise Filter - Amazon.com

 

Roch

 

My solar panels inject data into the mains in the same way as EoP (and you can use the same technology as an extender). I have a device that reads the data and posts it to a web server. It works if I have it plugged into the mains. It does not detect the RF data (noise) if I plug it into my Brickwall with the RF filter and the surge protector you like.

Link to comment

A Digital Audio Converter connected to my Home Computer taking me into the Future

Link to comment
As do those others we first posted.

 

 

 

Well, I prefer to listen to the bass in my recordings, rather than those who inhabit the wall sockets.

 

 

 

My solar panels inject data into the mains in the same way as EoP (and you can use the same technology as an extender). I have a device that reads the data and posts it to a web server. It works if I have it plugged into the mains. It does not detect the RF data (noise) if I plug it into my Brickwall with the RF filter and the surge protector you like.

 

There is not such a thing like "bass from your wall sockets". My point was about that some RF filters cause more harm than improvements, but forget about it.

 

BTW, solar panels are cost effective and from what cost per Kw / hour? I'm sorry for the OP for the out of thread.

 

Roch

Link to comment

 

 

I have an older Tripp Lite 1200 watt transformer model which I tried with just my computer. The sound lacked bass and was thin. So go big if you use one of these.

AMR 777 DAC, Purist Ultimate USB, PC server 4gig SOTM USB, server 2012, Audiophil Optimizer,Joule Preamp LAP150 Platinum Vcaps Bybee, Spectron Monoblocks Bybee Vcaps, Eggleston Savoy speakers, 2 REL Stentor III subwoofers, Pranawire Cosmos speaker wire, Purist Dominus Praesto cabling, Purist Anniversary (Canorus)power cables and Elrod Statement Gold power cable, VPI Aries I SDS w/Grado The Statement LP, 11kVA power isolation, 16 sound panels and bass traps TAD,RPG,GIK and Realtraps

Link to comment
From what I understand these types of devices may be able to filter noise. My surge protector and laptop power supply seem to have no ability to filter out the unwanted noise.
Superior filters would already be inside a laptop supply. Surge protectors ignore any voltage typically less than 330 volts (see its box for your number). Noise would be tens of volts or less. Clearly a surge protector would ignore (do nothing for) this anomaly.

 

So why is noise getting through best filters already inside a laptop supply? What other wires are incoming to that laptop? Are USB devices power externally? Does the laptop have a network cable? Start by listing all possible noise paths.

 

Obtain a cheater adaptor. It permits three prong appliances to connect to two prong receptacles. Use this to temporarily disconnect the safety ground wire. To learn if noise changes or is eliminated. This is not a solution. This is only step one: identify the problem. Solutions come later.

 

Safety ground wire completely bypassess filters in the laptop supply, filters in that Amazon.com solution, and filters in the Surgex, Brickwall, and Zerosurge products. Before spending money on a solution, first determine the incoming and the outgoing path of that noise current. A temporary disconnect of that safety ground might identify one of those two paths. Solution occurs after identifying the incoming and outgoing noise paths. Therefore even incoming wire to the audio system must be listed. Example, AC has a black wire, a white wire, and a green wire. Every wire must be defined to identify potential reasons for that noise.

Link to comment

I do sympathise with your situation but I can't help but notice the irony of this. From what I've read on the subject most users of power line networking have few if any problems, however little attention seems focussed on the anti-social aspect of this approach to networking: one user's reliable network can make the local environment much noisier for everyone else.

 

You say "Unfortunately I really need the power line networking" but don't say why. The ethernet alternative does not have to be completely wired to ensure a rock-solid network. If none of the suggestions given here for a cure to your problem work it might be worth considering a wired ethernet network with a wireless bridge to solve any physical location problems. I've found that a pair of airport extremes work very well as a bridge - I've been streaming hi-res audio (24/192) between 2 floors with no dropouts or other problems.

ALAC iTunes library on Synology DS412+ running MinimServer with Samsung Galaxy Tab S2 tablet running BubbleUPnP for control >

Hi-Fi 1: Airport Extreme bridge > Netgear switch > TP-Link optical isolation > dCS Network Bridge AND PS Audio PerfectWave Transport > PS Audio DirectStream DAC with Bridge Mk.II > Primare A60 > Harbeth SHL5plus Anniversary Edition .

Hi-Fi 2: Sonore Rendu > Chord Hugo DAC/preamp > LFD integrated > Harbeth P3ESRs and > Sennheiser HD800

Link to comment

There is a very simple way to test this:

 

(1) Unplug the PoE and see if the noise goes away. (If I read correctly, you did this and it did).

 

(2) Plug the receiver into the RF filter / surge protector of choice. If it no longer carries the IP signal, the RF filter is working.

 

Two observations:

 

a. I did not have any obviously audible interference from the PoE from my solar panels even before using the Brickwall filter and surge protector.

 

b. The wall-wart that came with my first OWC external hard drive polluted the mains to the point where it corrupted the solar panel data -- in other words, the hard drive's wall wart was far more "anti-social" than PoE. I still heard no audio degradation, but I got rid of it.

Link to comment
  • 2 weeks later...
I do sympathise with your situation but I can't help but notice the irony of this. From what I've read on the subject most users of power line networking have few if any problems, however little attention seems focussed on the anti-social aspect of this approach to networking: one user's reliable network can make the local environment much noisier for everyone else.

 

You say "Unfortunately I really need the power line networking" but don't say why. The ethernet alternative does not have to be completely wired to ensure a rock-solid network. If none of the suggestions given here for a cure to your problem work it might be worth considering a wired ethernet network with a wireless bridge to solve any physical location problems. I've found that a pair of airport extremes work very well as a bridge - I've been streaming hi-res audio (24/192) between 2 floors with no dropouts or other problems.

 

I second this; from the beginning I considered this power line networking technology anti-social as the RF noise spreads across the whole network. It's also paradoxical first to inject all kinds of RF and other noise into the power grid and then searching for solutions to filter this dirt out again. Sorry.

Link to comment

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now


×
×
  • Create New...