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Usb hifi os less than 2gb. Does it exist?


acvtre

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Hi everybody, I need a little help from you guys.

I need an audiophile operating system that runs from usb key, with about 4gb or less, and that is compatible with usb dac and usb hdd and that can be controlled by an android smartphone.

 

Voyage is too annoying and daphile doesn't work. Any other suggestion?

 

The best thing would be something like a portable foobar2000.

 

Thanks.

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Hi everybody, I need a little help from you guys.

I need an audiophile operating system that runs from usb key, with about 4gb or less, and that is compatible with usb dac and usb hdd and that can be controlled by an android smartphone.

 

Voyage is too annoying and daphile doesn't work. Any other suggestion?

 

The best thing would be something like a portable foobar2000.

 

Thanks.

 

Well, all I can think of is Voyage or maybe a stripped down Vortexbox.

No electron left behind.

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Do you have a separate computer as a server or perhaps a NAS you can install LMS on?

 

If so, how about a small Linux distribution and SqueezeLite?

Eloise

---

...in my opinion / experience...

While I agree "Everything may matter" working out what actually affects the sound is a trickier thing.

And I agree "Trust your ears" but equally don't allow them to fool you - trust them with a bit of skepticism.

keep your mind open... But mind your brain doesn't fall out.

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If you don't mind trying a stray puppy, mpdpup is an option. Stray because it's owner has abandoned it.... It's yet another abandoned Linux project.

 

It works though...

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I need an audiophile operating system that runs from usb key, with about 4gb or less, and that is compatible with usb dac and usb hdd and that can be controlled by an android smartphone.

 

Voyage MPD can be challenging if you run your network with fixed IP addresses. Also vi is an acquired taste. But you could easily install nano or some other (text based) editor on your machine, the debian package manager is fully operational. /etc/mpd.conf is usually the only file you have to adapt to your environment (unless you need a fixed IP address).

 

You might check OpenELEC as another option. This is an embedded version of XBMC. It requires a boot partition of 250 MB on your USB device and usually runs within 100 MB of main memory. You will need a monitor and keyboard to initially set it up. The "official" XBMC remote is available for Android and iOS.

Primary ::= Nabla music server | Mutec MC-3+USB w/ Temex LPFRS-01 RB clock | WLM Gamma Reference DAC; Secondary ::= Nabla music server | WaveIO | PrismSound Lyra

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You might want to try Community Squeeze OS, it is primarily designed to run on a Wandboard. Currently it comes as an image designed to be loaded onto an 8GB micro SB card that plugs into the Wandboard slot. It includes squeezelite for playing music, jivelite for a user interface based on what was in the SBTouch. It also includes the LMS server so you can use it as a standalone box if you wish, or run it over a network to LMS on another computer.

 

It comes with a webGui for setup purposes. Music control can be done with any of the numerous Sb control applications available for just about any platform, OR you can connect a HDMI display and use the jivelite interface to control it. Note that the jivelite interface works whether you are using local or remote LMS.

 

Output can be: USB, HDMI, S/PDIF optical (quad version only) or the built in analog out (which is pretty bad).

 

Storage can be: micro SD card, USB stick, USB drive or SATA drive (Quad version only).

 

The Wandboard comes in several different flavors, CSOS is designed to work with either the dual or quad core versions. Both come with wifi/bluetooth, gigabit Ethernet, two USB ports (one host, one OTG) each with its own controller. They both have an optical S/PDIF jack, but it's wired wrong on the dual, it works fine on the Quad. They both have a SATA jack, but again it only works on the quad.

 

It is under extensive development right now, so new upgrades are coming out almost daily, but you do NOT need to go through all that, just grad the official release and use it works fine out of the box. It is generally much easier to get up and running than other similar type systems, you don't have to edit files and such, just use a browser to get to the setup page to select a few things.

 

There is information on this at:

 

Community Squeeze

 

John S.

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John... Is there any time scale for the availability of the hardware portion of Community Squeeze OS?

Eloise

---

...in my opinion / experience...

While I agree "Everything may matter" working out what actually affects the sound is a trickier thing.

And I agree "Trust your ears" but equally don't allow them to fool you - trust them with a bit of skepticism.

keep your mind open... But mind your brain doesn't fall out.

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John... Is there any time scale for the availability of the hardware portion of Community Squeeze OS?

 

The beta version is all designed, it is waiting on the development of some software drivers. I'm HOPING this will be done this month.

 

The general release version will probably be a few months after the beta boards go out.

 

John S.

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So an estimate maybe around the summer?

The beta version is all designed, it is waiting on the development of some software drivers. I'm HOPING this will be done this month.

 

The general release version will probably be a few months after the beta boards go out.

 

John S.

Eloise

---

...in my opinion / experience...

While I agree "Everything may matter" working out what actually affects the sound is a trickier thing.

And I agree "Trust your ears" but equally don't allow them to fool you - trust them with a bit of skepticism.

keep your mind open... But mind your brain doesn't fall out.

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So an estimate maybe around the summer?

1. Install Debian or Voyage on a stick and configure it as you want. The Voyage specific scripts minimize writing to and from from the flash media. Set up automounting of USB disks. Cons: Doesn't save the library and other things until you do a ctrl-alt-del.

 

2. Install Debian or Voyage on HDD and configure as you want. Set up automounting of USB disks. Use Live tools to make a bootable read-only image. Library gets saved instantly. Cons: Not trivial at all, Needs a custom kernel that supports persistent storage. You also need to try to turn off most of the processes that write/logs to the disk, and you also need to mess around with the scripts to exclude certain folders/file to get the image as clean as you want. Pros: a workable image of about 60-70MB is possible.

Yay!

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