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Music Servers? You can keep them (for now)


davip

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Hello Chris et al. Here's something that's been on my mind for a while that I would be genuinely interested in a few opinions on.

 

Having played with an iPod touch for some time I find that I've rather lost interest in music servers, and not in a good way. Whatever the fate of recorded music is to be , the implementation of many of these systems is poor compared to what we have currently, as well as being ill thought-out, and often prohibitively expense. For examples of each, consider the following. It used to be that we put entire albums on to play during the good old days of vinyl, but having got used to the extremely well thought-out and simple 'operating system' of CD playback, I find that I miss it in music serving. When I want to hear a track number or the start of an album, I simply click one numbered button and I'm there. With a server (an iPod say), I have to scroll through categories, artists, albums and tracks -- even the Soolos (sp?), generally regarded as the finest implementation of this art, has an aspect of this.

 

Y'see, the reason I can do the 'one-touch' thing with my CDs is that I don't use CDs -- I use DVD-A. Bear with me! Although this format died a death, and is now as popular as Betamax, DVD-R discs are still available (indeed, they sell in the 100s of millions annually). There is plenty of freeware online (e.g., Adobeman's GUI -- Google it) that uses these discs to rip DVD-A discs of WAV files of whatever persuasion you like (e.g., in my case, mixed 16 and 24 bit music). I get just under 100 full-res red-book tracks on a home made DVD-A disc this way, each album or each indivdual track selectable by a press of one numbered button on the remote of my JVC EX-A1 micro (you know, the one with the wide-range wood cone speakers). One hundred tracks? What good is that you might say. However, I'll take any bets you like that I'll be doing the same thing in 12 months time with home made dual-layer Blu-ray (BD-A) discs, and they'll hold over 1000 full-res WAV files, each accessible in the same way. I have yet to find a serving system that gives me the same flexibiiity and ease of use (not to mention cost), both of which I'll come on to now.

 

As far as I can tell, the easiest computer serving set-up (at least, judged by the comments on CA) is the Mac mini. However, it has no real interface, unless you want to play music with a keyboard and a monitor, so the way to go is to control this with the ipod Touch. One flash computer used to control another HDD computer (with outboard hardware necessary for backup). Smart implementation? I don't think so, and I used to work in IT. Lastly, we come to cost. That Mac set-up will knock you back a cool 1000. And that's a cheapie. Look at the rest: the Sonneteer Morpheus, literally a 'music centre' (for those of us who remember such things) with a HDD -- an even cooler 5000. Then there's the Linn's and the Soolos' etc., with 10k tarrifs, not to mention the jokey Windows PCs dressed-up as audiophile jobs with 7000 price tags to match (e.g., see the last CES examples).

 

In short (!), we should all be cautious of consigning physical media to history (as the CA home page header suggests). The method of delivery may be going electronic, but the opportunistic way music on computer is being pushed by the audiophile companies and retailers looks sure to confine your dreams of a media-less world to a tiny percentage of the music-listening public, unless these vendors shape up on all the above fronts.

 

One of the delights of CDs for me (some compensation for the lousy sound quality), relative to vinyl, is that I am able to remove filler material from my listening -- crap tracks from albums, if you prefer (please, no nonsense about sitting down -- presumably alone, in the 'sweet spot' -- and listening to the whole of an album, unless you like your listening decided for you). Having done so, I now find that my entire music collection fits on 10 DVD-R/A discs. The whole lot will fit on one dual-layer BD-disc too. A hardware player (with hardware decoding of video, for anyone who knows the problems of software decoding) with a single, large-capacity disc in it is a music server in all but the computer aspect -- something I think most people would galdy do without.

 

Music servers? You can keep them!

 

Dave P

 

03/11/2009: UPDATE: I'm trying to push things this way though:

 

http://www.ipodtouchfans.com/forums/showthread.php?p=1933420#post1933420

 

 

 

 

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Assuming you have the amps and speakers, a music server only requires a DAC and a computer.

 

A Berkely DAC at $US5k and a top of the line Mac computer at $US3K will get you a great system.

 

Anyway, $US8K for an audiophile is a snip.

 

 

 

Keep on Upgrading!!!

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Are you seriously suggesting that a DVD-A or Blu Ray full of WAV's is easier to use than accessing all of your music using, for example, an iPod Touch?

 

Each to their own I guess, but I'd rather browse ALL of my albums, in one place, and play what I wish at the touch of a button.

 

If you feel physical media is better for you then that's great. But it's a definate backward step on what we have here.

 

Instead of spending time ripping a 100 tracks to a DVD-A, why not setup a playlist. Far easier.

 

HTPC: AMD Athlon 4850e, 4GB, Vista, BD/HD-DVD into -> ADM9.1

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I am indeed -- as I have both iPod Touch and DVD-A, I am well placed to do so. Tell me how you find a single album or track with one tap on the iPod screen and then compare that with the track access push of a remote control? I would have thought the ease issue was self-evident, but apparently not...

 

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Firstly - "no nonsense about sitting down -- presumably alone, in the 'sweet spot' -- and listening to the whole of an album". Wow, nice line there, funny how many music listeners out there still do that, call me boring, but it's still a practice I love to do when I have time (which is rare), I guess it's a throwback from when I was first asked (by my older brother) to sit down in "the sweet spot", close my eyes, and listen. That started it all, I guess some of us still go back there when we have a chance.

As for deleting crap songs from an album, after how many times of listening to a song is it deemed "crap"? bummer if you delete it after one listen, because it never happens that a song we never used to like becomes one of our favorites on an album.

Of course too, having worked in IT you realized that media such as DVD-R/A discs when used for backup of data, are duplicated incase the original gets damaged, something that is rarer in Hard Drive applications.

I don't mean to shoot down your article, but it's like saying "indoor plumbing - that'll never catch on!"

My personal goal in Computer Audiophilia is to move away from redbook CD's, download HD content from music sites, and capture that time again from the 80's listening in that sweet spot, with a Sondek, Naim 135's, original Kans, and my brother smirking and nodding his head, knowing I was hooked.

 

Music Servers? Yes ya'll - the new indoor plumbing!

 

Michael J. Howell[br]Macbook Pro, Airport Extreme Base Station, AppleTV, Majik, Numerik, Katans. Linn Silver and Audioquest 3 Toslink, AQ - Indigo (bi-wire), Mapleshade Bedrocks (yes these actually work).

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To quote Linn "Offering performance that surpasses any CD player and with the convenience of having your entire digital music collection at your fingertips, organised your way, you’ll never go back"

 

Linn said it, I believe it, that's the end of that.

 

Michael J. Howell[br]Macbook Pro, Airport Extreme Base Station, AppleTV, Majik, Numerik, Katans. Linn Silver and Audioquest 3 Toslink, AQ - Indigo (bi-wire), Mapleshade Bedrocks (yes these actually work).

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Hi Dave - Interesting perspective. There is no right or wrong here of course. I do think that you're really reaching for reasons not to like computer based playback and reaching even further for reasons to hang on to what's left of your existing comfort zone. Again, nothing wrong with any of this and it's only my opinion expressed here. I could be way off and would really like to continue the conversation so I can understand a little bit more of where you are coming from. You can't be the only person who thinks the way you do :~) There are obviously more hurdles the computer based world has to clear before "everyone" will be on board. Now, on to you specific statements.

 

 

Having played with an iPod touch for some time I find that I've rather lost interest in music servers, and not in a good way. Whatever the fate of recorded music is to be , the implementation of many of these systems is poor compared to what we have currently, as well as being ill thought-out, and often prohibitively expense.

For examples of each, consider the following. It used to be that we put entire albums on to play during the good old days of vinyl, but having got used to the extremely well thought-out and simple 'operating system' of CD playback, I find that I miss it in music serving.

 

The iPod Touch is not for everyone and should not weigh so heavily on one's decision when considering music servers as a whole. When you speak of poor implementation compared to what is currently available it's a bit like talking apples and oranges. Computers are not toasters as you know. There are many more pieces to the puzzle especially when comparing a music server to a Disc player. I'm not saying poor implementation is acceptable with music servers, I'm just saying comparing Disc players and music servers is like apples and oranges. CD Players are similar to toasters and appliances. They do one thing and one thing only. However, anything you can do with Vinyl or CDs you can do with a music server. Want to play an entire album? It's simple with a music server. One only needs patience.

 

When I want to hear a track number or the start of an album, I simply click one numbered button and I'm there. With a server (an iPod say), I have to scroll through categories, artists, albums and tracks -- even the Soolos (sp?), generally regarded as the finest implementation of this art, has an aspect of this.

 

I'm not following you on this one. When I want to hear a track number or start of an album I just select it from an iPod Touch without browsing through anything. The album playing remains on my screen and I have instant access to all the tracks. In fact with a music server I can hear the start of any album or a specific track number with one click when using remote desktop. I'm willing to bet you have to get up and find the physical disc if you want access to all of your music. Please take this in the spirit in which it's intended - It seems like a little music server education could go a long way toward getting you to possibly accept them more :~)

 

 

Y'see, the reason I can do the 'one-touch' thing with my CDs is that I don't use CDs -- I use DVD-A. Bear with me! Although this format died a death, and is now as popular as Betamax, DVD-R discs are still available (indeed, they sell in the 100s of millions annually). There is plenty of freeware online (e.g., Adobeman's GUI -- Google it) that uses these discs to rip DVD-A discs of WAV files of whatever persuasion you like (e.g., in my case, mixed 16 and 24 bit music). I get just under 100 full-res red-book tracks on a home made DVD-A disc this way, each album or each indivdual track selectable by a press of one numbered button on the remote of my JVC EX-A1 micro (you know, the one with the wide-range wood cone speakers). One hundred tracks? What good is that you might say. However, I'll take any bets you like that I'll be doing the same thing in 12 months time with home made dual-layer Blu-ray (BD-A) discs, and they'll hold over 1000 full-res WAV files, each accessible in the same way.

 

To be honest I think you're still polishing a turd. 1000 tracks on a physic disc is not desirable in my opinion. How do you access these tracks easily? Is there some menu you scroll through (music server-esque) or does your remote have 1000 buttons and you've memorized each track's button? Even with 100 tracks on a DVD-Audio disc. How do you switch from album to album and a specific track easily? Is there a discrete button for every track thus giving you the one-touch access you claimed earlier? Do you have all the 100 buttons memorized or are they on a touch screen? I am honestly curious on this one as I just don't see how this is anything other than an attempt to hang on to a dead technology even though it can't compete with what's available now if the new technology is configured properly.

 

have yet to find a serving system that gives me the same flexibiiity and ease of use (not to mention cost), both of which I'll come on to now.

 

I wouldn't consider your system flexible at all. I have access to 30,000 tracks with one click. I can create smart playlists to group albums by artists, sample rate, genre, and on and on ... It seems like your write once discs are pretty much set once you burn them and to access over 100 tracks you have to physically locate the next disc with a new set of 100 tracks. Do you have a list of all the tracks on each disc that you keep by your remote. I have all the track names and albums names with album art all available on my music server with one click from anywhere in my house. A used MacBook or Mac Mini can accomplish this easily. A cheap used PC for $300 can get the job done as well.

 

 

As far as I can tell, the easiest computer serving set-up (at least, judged by the comments on CA) is the Mac mini.

 

I disagree. The Mini is the smallest but not easiest. I think a MacBook for $999 is the easiest. It has the built-in monitor and keyboard and is bit perfect out of the box.

 

 

However, it has no real interface, unless you want to play music with a keyboard and a monitor, so the way to go is to control this with the ipod Touch.

 

I disagree again. The Mini can be controlled a number of ways and each is likely better than the way you control a DVD-Audio player. The Mini has Front Row which can be controlled via infrared remote and displayed nicely on any monitor or tv screen, iPod Touch Remote application, screen sharing which eliminates the need to a monitor and keyboard near the music server, third party infrared remotes, Crestron touch screen remotes. etc...

 

 

 

One flash computer used to control another HDD computer (with outboard hardware necessary for backup). Smart implementation? I don't think so, and I used to work in IT.

 

Can you elaborate on a better implementation that still has all the features and flexibility?

 

Lastly, we come to cost. That Mac set-up will knock you back a cool 1000. And that's a cheapie. Look at the rest: the Sonneteer Morpheus, literally a 'music centre' (for those of us who remember such things) with a HDD -- an even cooler 5000. Then there's the Linn's and the Soolos' etc., with 10k tarrifs, not to mention the jokey Windows PCs dressed-up as audiophile jobs with 7000 price tags to match (e.g., see the last CES examples).

 

I'm not following you non this one. $1000 is not expensive in my opinion for what one gets with a Mac setup.The Sooloos system is one of a kind right now. The interface has some serious R&D time and money into it and it really shows. If there was a competing DVD-Audio player for much less than I might think twice about the Sooloos and agree with you.

 

In short (!), we should all be cautious of consigning physical media to history (as the CA home page header suggests).

 

Can you elaborate on this one?

 

The method of delivery may be going electronic, but the opportunistic way music on computer is being pushed by the audiophile companies and retailers looks sure to confine your dreams of a media-less world to a tiny percentage of the music-listening public, unless these vendors shape up on all the above fronts.

 

Wow, I disagree even more. Audiophile companies are not pushing computer based playback. Consumers are pushing these companies much harder than they can take. In fact many audiophile companies have yet to release any computer based product or any product that interfaces with a traditional computer. Companies sell what consumers purchase, it's that easy. If physical CDs were still the medium of choice all the stores would be more than happy to sell them and keep Apple out of the loop on downloads.

 

 

One of the delights of CDs for me (some compensation for the lousy sound quality), relative to vinyl, is that I am able to remove filler material from my listening -- crap tracks from albums, if you prefer (please, no nonsense about sitting down -- presumably alone, in the 'sweet spot' -- and listening to the whole of an album, unless you like your listening decided for you).

 

Not following you here either. I know you mentioned listening to an entire album earlier in your post, but maybe that was unrelated. Removing material from your listening is not exclusive to CDs. Music servers can accommodate his with much more ease.

 

Having done so, I now find that my entire music collection fits on 10 DVD-R/A discs. The whole lot will fit on one dual-layer BD-disc too. A hardware player (with hardware decoding of video, for anyone who knows the problems of software decoding) with a single, large-capacity disc in it is a music server in all but the computer aspect -- something I think most people would galdy do without.

 

I would rather have the choice to use many different hardware components. You are limited to Bluray players which currently don't have what I would call audiophile audio quality. I think you are really stretching it by calling a Bluray player a music server. Technically, maybe, but it is no different than a CD player. The Bluray player only holds more music. Using your logic we would have to consider a turn table a music server and a cassette player a music server and a CD player a music server. Each one capable of holding more music. By the way, how much are Bluray burners and the blank discs? When you purchase a new CD can you easily get that material on to an existing Bluray disc?

 

Music servers? You can keep them!

 

By the time I finished responding I starting thinking that your post was actually a joke and you were looking to provoke the natives into a frenzy.

 

Founder of Audiophile Style

UPDATED: My Audio Systems -> https://audiophile.style/system

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No one expects everybody to abandon their CD or DVD players for music servers and computer audio. I will probably always have a universal player for flexibility to play the physical discs that I have. But the advantages of music servers cannot be denied despite the fact that computer audio is just in its infancy.

 

“When I want to hear a track number or the start of an album, I simply click one numbered button and I'm there” - is easily accomplished on any computer. MediaMonkey Gold for instance is capable of managing over 100,000 tracks. All the tracks can be auto-tagged and incrementally numbered. You can also write custom scripts to automatically do almost anything that can be manually done based on your music library database.

 

You want to play track number 91,283 now – no problem. You want to play music of a certain composer, album, performance, recording, artist, etc. – no problem. Simple searches, compound searched, complex searches – no problem.

 

“With a server (an iPod say), I have to scroll through categories, artists, albums and tracks” - is almost universally employed in music servers because that is what makes sense, although much more is possible. After all, unless you have a data index or table somewhere, what is track 4,283 or track 67? Well track 4,283 is Maria- Oscar Peterson Trio-West Side Story and track 67 is Jamaica Farewell-Harry Belafonte-Belafonte at Carnegie Hall. Which information is more important is selecting music is obvious and moreover, the computer can provide all.

 

 

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I think this is certainly a viable option and thanks for sharing the info about Adobeman. From my perspective this could even be added to the CASH or the Academy as an option to consider, but all the other options offered on this site would be a step up. In fact, its a good contrast for explaining why we want a music server to begin with.

 

Once you have your DVD's burned, you do have a pretty simple system for playback, though I am pretty happy with my Touch Remote which works outside of line of site from my player (e.g. another room if I want).

 

From a cost perspective, this option requires a DVD writer and an XP computer, which is about a $500 investment. Adobeman suggests 2 separate hard drives, so maybe $600. If you are going to playback from your computer, you will find lots of info on this site on how to get your music off your machine and to a DAC. If you are going to playback from a DVD player in your listening room, you will need a very high end DVD player or blue ray to compare to a 5K outboard DAC (your comparison - cheaper DACs are available of course). Or you can get an entry level DVD or blue ray player with a digital out and run it through an outboard DAC.

    Regardless of your transport method, you are going to pay for the DAC
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I guess I'm just really confused as to how having 100's of songs on a disc (I'm assuming with no way to browse them or know where tracks are) is as simple as a couple of fingers sweeps and taps on an iPod Touch.

 

But as I say, if that's your comfort zone then that's great for you.

 

I don't want to see the end of pyhsical media for different reasons (HD film downloads are no match for BluRay) but for music, sorry, I don't get it.

 

HTPC: AMD Athlon 4850e, 4GB, Vista, BD/HD-DVD into -> ADM9.1

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Splendid -- thanks for all your responses. I think my perspective, implied certainly but not entirely picked-up in the comments, is that music serving has a way to go before it reaches the ease of CD. Whether the disc is a 10-track CD, 100-track DVD or a 1000-track BD, the instant track access feature is simplicity itself, and something music servers have yet to match: put the albums on the disc in track order, and playing the whole album is a just a matter of hitting the number of the first track on the remote. Don't underestimate the willingness of people to ignore a better alternative in the name of simplicity (citing "mp3" here should make this point).

 

That point is that music serving does not have this ease to it (I'm talking simplicity, not flexibility), and I doubt it will ever come, despite the wishes of a few 1000 computer audiophiles. It is indeed like comparing apples and oranges Chris: computers are not toasters, as you say, and neither were they designed for user friendly music playback; they can be made to do so, and there will always be providers to capitalise on the audiophile market for add-ons (e.g., the unfortunate recent CA forum tale of the lawyer cum con-man who tricked a CA member out of $3500 for a lousy DAC), but I just don't think the music-listening public has the 'patience' that you concede is necessary for their use. I am far from unfamiliar with computers, and it's more patience than I can muster -- as generally implemented, it gets in the way of the music.

 

"I'm not following you on this one. When I want to hear a track number or start of an album I just select it from an iPod Touch without browsing through anything...". Perhaps I was obscure here: Often I like to listen to single tracks from different albums (never the same, so forget playlists), and a push of '4' on the remote gets me Statues by OMD, a push of '7 7' gets me The Box by Fad Gadget, and so-on (and like CDs, after a while you get to know the numbers, so don't even have to look at the insert). I have an ipod Touch, so tell me how you do that "...without browsing through anything"? All of the foregoing also explains how I switch from album to album easily. Oh, and there is no backup as such, as I own all my own music on CD -- where I don't have the disc, a backup on my work PC and one on my 64GB thumb drive (> 1000 wav files) serves here

 

"The Mini is the smallest but not easiest. I think a MacBook for $999 is the easiest. It has the built-in monitor and keyboard". This is my point Chris -- if you are happy to have a keyboard and a monitor as part of your listening experience then that's fine, but it isn't for everyone (in fact, I would wager that it's mostly for no-one) and that is why the evolution of the 'format' you're looking for likely won't happen. People have a well-founded (dis)respect for computers based on experience -- they use them when they have to for work or to comunicate. Like I said, it gets in the way (and as for 'writing custom scripts' in music listening, QED).

 

Once you have your Macs, RAID, wireless network, NAS etc. setup, perhaps it all works fine and dandy, but let's not try and kid anyone that this was easy! Look at your forum -- are there comparable fora online where people quiz each other about how to make music come out of their CD player? No. It is such aspects as make formats fail, and I truly think home music serving will never be anything more than a niche thing for audiophiles with a technical bent. What do you think will happen when BDs are released with the entire remastered Beatles and Pink Floyd catalogues on a single disc? Who do you think will make the money and the headway here: the purveyors of $199 BD players or those of computer-based audio?

 

I'm not provoking the natives -- I used to be one, but I've given my iPod to my gf and gone back to optical. When it's a BD-RW, it'll be a single disc in a player I'll never have to remove except to add new albums EAC'd on my work PC (which is BD already, my employer paying for my works computing). Like I said, it serves music to me in the way I want, and is just as rosy in its other name.

 

I thank you all for your responses -- and will keep up with the site, sticking my oar in as-and-when

 

cheers,

Dave

 

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Very interesting take on this Dave. It does remind me of a few statements from Bill Gates back in the early 90s.

 

"The Internet? We are not interested in it."

 

"The Internet is a passing fad and unimportant."

 

I can also think of countless people who said email, let alone text messaging, would never take off. Why type a message when you can just call someone.

 

Don't take it personal, but I have a pretty strong feeling your statement, "I truly think home music serving will never be anything more than a niche thing for audiophiles with a technical bent." Will be grouped in the category of those above pretty fast.

 

"That point is that music serving does not have this ease to it (I'm talking simplicity, not flexibility), and I doubt it will ever come, despite the wishes of a few 1000 computer audiophiles."

 

I think you should add three zeros to your number and think about those of us with thousands of albums. I don't think a BRD with a thousand tracks to memorize equates to simplicity or convenience. I think a Sooloos equates to simplicity and convenience while a computer based system equates to ultimate sound quality. Bluray offers neither in my opinion.

 

Founder of Audiophile Style

UPDATED: My Audio Systems -> https://audiophile.style/system

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From what I just read the Movie Industry is running scared of Video Servers.

 

http://www.nytimes.com/2009/04/24/technology/24dvd.html?hpw

 

Music Servers and Video Servers may not be for everyone, but the demand exists and it is a real challenge to those business models that want to keep us tied to physical discs.

 

Personally, I like optical discs but I don't like to be tied to them. Just imagine having software programs that only run on a computer's optical drive and cannot be installed on the computer's hard drive.

 

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If the user interface of an iPod or iPod touch/iPhone is not to your liking, then just locate a laptop or tablet at your listening position. This has a large screen and you can view lots of music all at once. you can and build large playlists.

 

There are too many advantages of computer audio to ignore it just because of a particular user interface:

 

1) his-res downloads

2) playlists that play all day long

3) building playlists in seconds - try to do this with a carousel CD player

4) music media that never degrades - CDs degrade over time

5) instant access to all of your music in your library - manually, searches by genre or by artist etc..

6) interchange of tracks over a network to another computer or device

 

Steve N.

Empirical Audio

 

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the legend says, sat on his throne on the seashore, while waves lapped round his feet!

 

Steve's reply above covers off most of the issues but there are some more:

 

And just how do all the tracks get written onto the DVD-A of Blu-Ray? By the computer server system in the first place.

 

How much storage is on a blu-ray disc 50Gb, and up to 200Gb in multi layered discs. I have 750Gb of music so thats no much use either.

 

Computer Audio/Server systems may have a long way to go but at least they will get there, whereas DVD-A and even Blu-ray will just be small footnotes in history.

 

 

 

 

 

Trying to make sense of all the bits...MacMini/Amarra -> WavIO USB to I2S -> DDDAC 1794 NOS DAC -> Active XO ->Bass Amp Avondale NCC200s, Mid/Treble Amp Sugden Masterclass -> My Own Speakers

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I think that a lot of the comments here touch on the different reasons people have for preferring to use a computer as part of their music playback system.

 

If, for instance, you believe that a computer-based system is capable of delivering better sound quality than anything else (as, I think, for example, Chris Connaker does), and if sound quality is non-negotiable, then that is the end of the discussion.

 

But if it's all about convenience and flexibiity, well, opinions are going to vary. I find playing a CD a lot easier than choosing music on a computer, but I do keep my CD's in alphabetical order ( by artiste/composer)

 

Then again, if I want to listen to a random selection of music, the computer is ideal in many ways. I have to say, though, I could happily live with 100-song playlists on disc. In fact, I've found that playlists on the computer can be too long, because, if I listen to the same one, playing randomly, over several separate listening sessions (having turned everything off between sessions) I seem to hear a lot of repeats. Breaking them down into smaller chunks - say 100 songs - and selecting a different playlist for each listening session works better. So, 100 song discs would be just fine (and, in fact, I've started to create similar compilations in anticipation of delivery of my PS Audio Perfect Wave transport, which should be any day/week now).

 

There just isn't a right answer to all of this - only answers that are right for particular individuals and their individual needs/preferences.

 

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What happened to the 100 plus capacity cd players that companies used to make ?? I think it would be nice to have a machine that could load 100 plus Blu-ray disks is that 5tb ?? that would be a nice back up machine for your music files in whatever resolution. Now if we had a HD that backed up to these multiple capacity BR machines this would be a way to go. Possibly DSD format then d/l to BR at whatever resolution and those to come !!

 

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What about this :

http://www.sonystyle.com/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/ProductDisplay?catalogId=10551&storeId=10151&langId=-1&productId=8198552921665231960

 

My 2c, the computer based medium allows me to explore my music selection more-either having a browse through my album art - search through my favourite tracks - and my favourite - by year so I can listen to all the music in no particular order from my high school days!

So from my sheltered existance I say bring on more CA but for the mean time will be from the ripping of physical discs.

 

PS3 60bg (160GB installed + Native music Browser)-AVI ADM9.1-Klipsch SW12 Subwoofer-Belkin Power Board- Custom power cables-Supra Sub Cable- No Name Toslink Cable - PROUD NZer

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I understand the ability to create song/music lists etc.

 

If you have placed 900 CDs at 10 songs a CD (yes I have this many CDs) there would be about 9,000 songs.

 

Do people realistically expect to create a 20 song list (as an example) after going through 9000 songs?

 

Some will (of course). I just make it easy for myself and play a CD (collection of songs) from a musician/group since the author has created a song list for the audience.

 

Keep on Upgrading!!!

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It's really quite simple. You just organize your music by genre. Then you can go through a subset and easily build a playlist. I even have sub-categories. I have my best quality jazz and then the lesser jazz recordings for instance.

 

I often build 50 track playlists very quickly.

 

Steve N.

Empirical Audio

 

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I feel the above media system I linked to is more for the custom install market who wants all their movies on demand everywhere in the house.

The computer solution just tends to be more flexible and cost efficient for the DIY crowd IMHO.

 

PS3 60bg (160GB installed + Native music Browser)-AVI ADM9.1-Klipsch SW12 Subwoofer-Belkin Power Board- Custom power cables-Supra Sub Cable- No Name Toslink Cable - PROUD NZer

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Fit all my music on 10 DVD-R, that will be a nice trick!

I don't mind using keyboard and mouse as it sure beats searching through 1000's of CDs in my collection any day.

All those bending down, squinting at small labels and swearing when I can't find a CD is not something that I miss. Sure I do have some kind of filing system for my music but never as simple as looking it up in a computer.

For sure, there are plenty of CDs in my music library that I have not listened in years and don't even remember having until they are on my hard drives. Now I get to hear them again much more often than once in 10 years.

 

If I don't get to hear the entire album in one sitting, it is most likely that I find not the entire album worthwhile listening to. Of course I always have a choice of listening though an entire album if I want to. Nothing will stop me from that. Even better, I can listen to multi CD sets (I have lots of operas) with no odd stop at inopportune time.

So, music server for me please! Just a different perspective, I suppose.

 

 

 

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