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Is anybody actually doing this for any reason other than to keep a copy of their music and for convenience? To me the thought of transferring vinyl to digital is so unappealing I don't even take it seriously. Has anyone had good luck with this or heard anything good about it?

 

- Chris

Computer Audiophile | Turn Down The Silence

 

 

Founder of Audiophile Style

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I rip lp's to my mac music server all the time. I prefer 60's and 70's music on vinyl. I use Roxio's Toast and Jam. It's just to easy and it sounds darn near as good and the vinyl. Don't get me wrong, I am not a vinyl head and I don't have a high $ turntable, I just like music and I am willing to work for what I want. There is a lot of stuff that will never make to the digital marketplace.

 

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Hey Allan - It is good to hear that it sounds close to the actual vinyl. This just seems to be something the hi end world has not cared about because there aren't many audiophile quality products out there to convert vinyl to a computer. What format are you ripping your vinyl to?

 

It is a shame that not all of our favorite vinyl will make it to the digital marketplace. I just got the new acoustic sounds catalog and there is a picture of the 30,000 mostly unopened LPs they just purchased from a collector. Kind of cool.

 

Also, it is unreal that vinyl is going to outlast compact discs!

 

 

- Chris

Computer Audiophile | Turn Down The Silence

 

Founder of Audiophile Style

Announcing The Audiophile Style Podcast

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Hi Chris

 

Ya I get all the catalogs too. Interesting. I only rip what I can find or the redbook sound quality sucks. I rip acc them convert to apple lossless. Funny 60's and 70's rips sound outstanding but most of the 80's stuff i've rip sounds so so. Vinyl is now a niche market and is becoming more popular everyday. Me I like buying used records and putting them on my server. A good Album cost 4 bucks. Can't beat that.

 

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  • 2 weeks later...

I rip whatever I can't get on CD... if I really want it. The process is a hassle, but some music is worth it. I spent a lot of effort on getting a good copy of Dave Brubeck/Gerry Mulligan "Compadres," and am happy I could find one. The CD sounds great. If Columbia ever puts this on CD I'll be happy... maybe. Depends on the mastering job.

 

Equipment:

Rega Planar 5 turntable w/ Rega arm and Exact cartridge

Graham Slee Reflex phono stage

Mackie 1202 mixer for gain control

Alesis Masterlink ML9600 for recording, basic edits and final CD

 

Process is basic. Clean the record, sample for levels. The ML9600 has no input level control so I use the Mackie for that. Once that's done, record the album as one long track. When finished, I trim the lead-in groove noise, advance to the end of the song, make a new track. Go on to the end of the side and trim the lead-out and side 2 lead-in. Continue to the end. Check all the track breaks. Finally, tell the Masterlink to burn a Redbook CD. Then I import that with Itunes, adding the tags manually.

 

Because I like the Benchmark DAC1 I'm thinking of buying one of their ADC1s to use in the recording process. Input to either the ML9600, bypassing the Mackie, or straight to the computer.

 

Mastering is a big issue these days. New CDs are mastered loud and compressed. This annoys me. The sound of a good LP or a good CD is just magical, but I don't run into many of these. I guess I should just get an Ipod and listen at 128k.

 

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If that's what it takes to get good sound I think us audiophiles would do it. Too bad Joe Public would be lost trying this.

 

"I guess I should just get an Ipod and listen at 128k." Ha, good one!

 

 

- Chris

Computer Audiophile | Turn Down The Silence

 

Founder of Audiophile Style

Announcing The Audiophile Style Podcast

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Audio-Technica: Audio-Technica has announced the $229 AT-LP2D-USB LP-to-digital recording system, which will be displayed at CES2008.

 

The AT-LP2D-USB includes a cartridge, the turntable, PC- and Mac-compatible software, a USB cable that connects the turntable directly to a computer, and "other accessories" including, we presume, a phono section.

 

More from Stereophile.

 

or full details from Audio-Technica.

 

- Chris

Computer Audiophile | Turn Down The Silence

 

Founder of Audiophile Style

Announcing The Audiophile Style Podcast

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