Jump to content
  • bobfa
    bobfa

    Allo USBridge Sig Review

    This is a slightly different review for me.  It is hardware review that focuses on a lot of software not supplied by the hardware vendor.  It is also about integrating both hardware and disparate software systems. Finally, the end results totally surprised and delighted me and everyone else who has participated.

     

    The Allo USBridge Sig arrived with the Volumio software installed. Since I reviewed the Volumio Primo over the summer, I thought that starting using the Volumio on the Allo was a great idea.  

     

    As a refresher, Volumio software is a complete music playback system for local files, streaming services, and Internet Radio.  Volumio is a complete Linux OS with a competent and flexible music player that is lightweight and designed to run on small computers. MyVolumio is an add on SAAS component to bring more services to play.

     

    The Hardware 

    allo-usbridge-sig-internal.jpg

     

     

    By using the Raspberry Pi 3+ compute module instead of the standard Pi 3+, Allo gains the flexibility to provide dedicated external interfaces.  The USBridge Sig board is engineered to isolate the ethernet noise from the compute module and to isolate the clean USB port for your DAC.  By providing the standard 40 pin interface connector, they give access to HAAT systems such as the DIGIONE Signature SPDIF board installed in the case I have.

     

    There are two separate power supply inputs on the case, one for the mainboard with the Pi computer and one for the DIGIONE board set. The Shanti power supply manages this with its two outputs.  The Shanti is a linear power supply with super-capacitor outputs.  It ships with multiple adaptors for different input connections, providing two fixed outputs 5V 3A and 5V 1A as a match to the Pi boards and HAATs. 

     

    allo-shanti-power-supply-front.jpg

     

     

     

    Allo has “earth” or ground binding posts on both the Shanti and its case for the USBridge Sig.  Allo is very insistent that you run a separate grounding connection between the devices and include your DAC if there is a way to do that.

     

    allo-usbridge-sig-case-back.jpgallo-shanti-power-supply-back.jpg

     

    That wraps up the hardware and a once over lightly for the Volumio Software.  Now to the testing and how does it sound?

     

     

    First, let's set the “sound-stage!”  

     

    The Software

     

    I am working through four Operating Systems that provide different services on the Allo USBridge Sig in this review. 

     

    allo-usbridge-sig-front.jpg

     

     

     

    1. Ropieee is a Roon endpoint application, and it has an XL version that does more.
    2. DietPi is a general-purpose Linux implementation for the Pi.
    3. Volumio is a music playback system that is a stand-alone and multi-room music playback system that also an SAAS component. 
    4. MoOde audio player is a stand-alone “Audiophile-quality” music player.

     

    I flashed microSD cards for this testing.  They are The V30 speed cards, and they help performance on Volumio and MoOde Music Players. I want to try the faster UHS II V60 or V90  cards to see if they improves performance.

     

    Here are a couple of notes of caution going down the software path that this hardware leads us.

     

    • Qobuz in the open-source world  
      • Qobuz was suffering theft of services against their service.  They have made several changes that, in effect, shut out some Open Source systems access.  Today for my testing, I cannot merely use DietPi to play Qobuz streams.  
    • Problems in the Linux 4.19xx kernel  
      • As of this writing, the current version of the Linux kernel used by some of the player software has a defect that causes clicks/pops to some DSD DACs.  (Including mine)

     

    This testing involved lots of learning and unlearning.  There is fussing / fiddling around with software and settings and a whole lot more.  I have shut down, rebooted, yanked the power, swapped USB cables, and typed on the Linux command line for a lot more hours than ever before!  As an example: after Volumio I moved over  to MoOde to get a feel of how it worked. I did a terrible job of reading, let alone understanding MoOde.  The underlying music player software is MPD, and you have to configure MPD with your USB DAC attached.  Read the Manual! Get on their forum for help.

     

    I did some of my initial listenings on my Schiit LYR3 with multi-bit DAC and with my Chord Mojo. The results were rather promising, and it helped with the break-in.  Then I moved into my main system and spent a few days listening, bouncing between my Server and the Allo.  The Allo started on a good foot and over time, it really hit its stride.  After about three weeks of on-time things were very stable!

     

     

    The Hook-up

     

    I have the USBridge Sig connected directly to my Ethernet network, and my Xeon based server/streamer connects via an opticalModule Fiber Media Converter to the same network.  I swap the Lush2 USB cable from the Xeon box (+tXUSBultra) to the USBridge Sig. 

     

    My Xeon box runs Euphony OS so it can swap around between the Roon components and Stylus player.  I have primarily been running it with Roon + StylusEP.

     

    I have an i7 NUC in my office that I also have Euphony OS on.  It runs as a second Roon server.  Again it as the same flexibility.  It is connected to the Ethernet network directly.

     

    My music library is on a QNAP NAS located in the basement.  There is no extraordinary power or network, just Ethernet, to the main Ubiquiti Switch.

     

    My system setup before the testing is shown in my profile here on AS:

     

    @bobfa Audio System

     

     

     

     

     

    Beginning to Listen: FINALLY! 

     

    allo-usbridge-kii-sotm.jpg

     

    First we have to have music!

     

    I want to thank @The Computer Audiophile and @austinpop and Kii Audio for their Qobuz Playlists. They are very helpful in finding a variety of music and not get stuck on “that one track.”   I have also added a playlist of some of the tracks I use.  I have more but this gives you a flavor.

            

     

     

    There are dozens of permutations, hundreds of settings and options that I could have tried.  I have kept this “simple” I am using three configurations. On Device Music Player, Squeezelite, and UPnP.  Where Possible!

     

    I started my actual listening tests using Ropieee as the Roon Bridge. I was disappointed in the sound quality.  Many of us have found that Room Bridge has some limitations. We have moved to Squeezelite. My time with Ropieee ended rather quickly.

     

    I setup DietPi next, and to be honest, I did not bother listening to it much at all.  I did not want to learn how it worked to run different software packages, too much GEEK!.  Maybe it was just a bad day. I want to listen to music, not manage another computer.  If there is time later, I will setup DietPi and compare it to the others.  Yes, I have to read the manual!  I am sure I am not giving DietPi a fair shake yet.  

     

    That left me with two options to work with: Volumio and MoOde!

     

    As noted above, I started with Volumio and MoOde as a stand-alone streaming solution against Roon+StylusEP on my Server.  I could not conduct some of my tests fairly as Volumio can do Qobuz via SAAS, and MoOde only plays local files without a different control point application. 

     

    Volumio works fine on the USBridge Sig, I had some problems with the iOS App finding the Allo on the network.   In the end, Volumio did not sound as good as MoOde.  It lacked clarity and depth in comparison.  I have now narrowed myself down to one OS, WHEW!  

     

    The MoOde player's user interface is pretty simple and clean.  Using the UI on small screens is hard.  On a large iPad or a laptop it is fine.  My system also has a large display hooked up to the Allo.  I use a cordless mouse to navigate.  MoOde has surprised everyone who has listened to it on my system.  It is great!  In any mode we tried.

     

    I am still trying to find a good UPnP control point for iOS devices.  I guess good is relative.  I finally got MConnect HD working on the iPad after finding a bug that took me two days to work out.  USE the GEAR icon to find your renderer. I also used BubbleUPNP on my Android Phone.  Of course, that is not all you have to do.  You need your local music on a device that is UPnP.  Fortunately, all I had to do is to configure Plex on my NAS to include my music folder.  

     

    During listening, I did not bother to search in Mconnect ; I just ran down the file/folder structure.  For some reason, there is no artwork displayed. I was mostly getting the PLEX logo on my local library.

     

    This testing showed much more of the promise coming from the Allo, but, I had to pause this project for about 10 days. 

     

    At this point, I was dizzy trying to keep notes flipping back and forth, WHEW.  I had my friend Rich come over for coffee and music. Comparing the Allo and my Xeon server has been a self-defeating process.  I have been so happy at my progress in building something that sounds so great.  Only to be squarely kicked in the rear by the Allo USBridge Sig!  

     

    In summary, I think that my friend Rich said it best; he would be happy with either device!  After another few days of listening, I have to agree.  BUT WAIT THERE IS MORE!

     

    I switched MoOde over to Squeezelite and started using it as a Roon endpoint.  So now, the software paths are similar. We are “closer” using Squeezelite on the Allo and StylusEP on the Xeon.  The made the A/B a bit simpler as long as they did not crash the USB bus!

     

    We have a photo finish. The imaging is almost identical. I had some help with blind A/B testing, and it is to the point I have a tough time telling the difference.  There seems to be a bit more detail in the USBridge Sig and a little more harmonic fullness in the Xeon box.   

     

    This past weekend my friend Eli came over and listened.  He made many of the same conclusions that others have made.  The USBridge Sig is a great piece of hardware with the right software to make it shine.  (There will be more notes in my upcoming update on the DIGIONE Signature boards)

     

     

     The last lap

     

     Can I make the USBridge Sound Better?

     (Note that during this testing I was using MoODe with Squeezelite)

     

     While I was at this, I created a side project to try to “improve the sound quality” from the Allo!  

     

     I did an A/B with and without the txUSBultra connected between the Allo and the Kii Control.

     

    While this did make a difference, it was not enough to even consider back ending a $1500 device on the Allo.  The USB side of the USBridge Sig does its job, Thank You Very Much!

     

    The next A/B trial was to move my Sonore opticalModule to the Ethernet input on the USBridge.  I did not spend much time listening as I had to reboot on every change for some reason. I did not hear any difference with the FMC inline.

      

    Note that the opticalModule makes a very noticeable difference when connected to the standard Ethernet port on my Xeon server.  Again the folks at Allo seem to have done a great job on the input side.

     

     

    In Summary: The Hook-up

       

    Note that I fronted the Shanti power supply with a Transparent Generation 5 High-Performance Power cord. Yes, the cord costs more than the Shanti!  

       

    The USB cable I am using on the output of the USBridge Sig is the Phasure Lush’2 cable as the last link to the Kii Control.  But again, this cable is around $250, which is more than the USBridge Sig board costs!

       

    I feel that it is a very fair testing method, keeping everything the “same” around the unit under test. 

       

    In summary, the Allo USBridge Sig is an excellent value for the money, and it plays well above its price class.  Buy it in the bundle with the Shanti power supply and get the metal case; it is worth the price! 

       

    The hardest part of this review was starting to learn how all the different software packages work and finding software to do thinks like UPnP.    It is my understanding that Allo is working on improving the software situation!  

       

    Software and hardware stability in these rather complex systems can be a problem. Once running, the systems were stable during most of the testing. 

       

    To be completely open: more than once, I confused the USB interface on the Kii Control by swapping between devices, and that caused me to have to power it down.  I am having software issues with Roon on Euphony OS (RAM Loaded), as the system would stop talking to the DAC over USB that I am still debugging.  The problem seems to be around the audio endpoint in Roon.  I am seeing this on both of my Roon boxes and with other DACs.

     

    Going forward, I am set up to test the DIGIONE Signature board set on the USBridge Sig card. Expect additional reporting on that soon.

     

    In closing, I almost hate to admit that the USBridge Sig with the Shanti power supply sounds better than my custom-built Xeon.

     

     

     

    Just One More Thing!

     

    allo=usbridge-sig-setup.jpg

     

    As I was finishing up my review I had to go back over my listening and my configurations, ONE MORE TIME.  I started back using the Allo as the render in with Roon on the NUC server and Squeezelite on the Allo.  

     

    Then I went back to native MoOde and UPnP for Tidal and Qobuz.  The soundstage opened up, there is more detail.  Vocalists are more defined.  Listening at lower volume levels is even more satisfying.  

     

    Maybe there is something to what I have heard about MPD sounding the best? The MPD/UPnP path eliminates a lot of software, network traffic. 

     

    I am now using the USBridge Sig as the main / only device in the music system and I am  storing the local music on my NAS with an SMB share with the moOde Player.  Adding in streaming from Qobuz and Tidal using Mconnect HD rounds out the mix.  So one app on the iPad for streaming and Safari Web  browser for local music playback.   This is not Roon but it works and sounds great!  I will run with this for a while and see how we all feel operating the system.  I know that I will be happy to just listen for a while and not be testing.  

     

     

    Bob Fairbairn

     

    OK, OK; I still have to do the DIGIONE Signature !  I promise.

     

     

     

     

    Product Information

     

    • USBridge Sig  Board is $239 (link)
    • DIGIONE Signature boards $239 (link)
    • Shanti Power Supply $159 (link)
    • Case for Board only is $20 (link)
    • Case for Board with space for DIGIONE $23

     

    **Look into Allo combination pricing!

     

     

    Other equipment in the mix

     

    Kii Three + BXT + Kii Control

    Xeon server with HDPlex400

    Custom NUC with HDPlex200

    Modified SOtm txUSBultra

    Sonore opticalModule

    Lush2 USB

    Ghent JSSG360 USB

    Transparent HP USB

    Transparent HP Ethernet

    Ghent JSSG360 Ethernet

    UpTone Audio LPS-1.2 running the txUSBultra 

    Transparent Audio HP power cables and power bank 6

    QNAP NAS

    Ubiquity UniFi Network 

     

    Primary Software used

     

    Bubble UPnP on Android

    MconnectHD on iPad for UPnP

    MConnect on the iPhone for UPnP

    MoOde OS

    Volumio OS

    Roon

    Euphony OS

    Squeezelite Roon Endpoint

    StylusEP Roon Endpoint 

    Plex server on QNAP NAS

     

     

    ______________

     

     

    The purpose of life is not to be happy.

    It is to be useful, to be honorable,

    to be compassionate,

    to have it make some difference

    that you have lived and lived well.

     

    Ralph Waldo Emerson

     

     

    “Enjoy the music and the fun.”



    User Feedback

    Recommended Comments



    Fab that so much has been written about it, and explored with many angles. The USBridge Sig is no longer a dirty little secret here. If I had to reboot my USB setup, USBridge Sig+Shanti+ Lush^2 would be my 1st choice.

     

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites

    Good writeup.

    I had to go though much of the same to get my sig working, so I can sympathize.  But its a keeper too, was worth the effort.

     

    BTW, as an FYI, with mconnect you can add SMB directories to the Favorites tab on bottom.  So if I want to listen to my locally stored SMB files, I push Favorites and then navigate to the file I want to hear.

    So you can do everything within Mconnect, no need to use another program.

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites

    I am still wondering down all of the paths that this review has taken me.  I am trying to summarize them in a post that does not strictly follow as part of this review.  You can find that here:

     

     

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites

    Now add the DigiOne Signature and see what it can really do! :):)

     

    BTW, have you connected (or not) the grounding studs of the USBridgeSig & the Shanti? 

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites

    The cost of software!

     

    I would like everyone who starts down these paths to look that the software they are using and contribute to that cause. I have settled on MoOde Audio software to run on my Allo.  I have been contributing on the forum over there and I have made a monetary contribution also.

     

    Bob 

     

     

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites
    3 minutes ago, suzywong said:

    Now add the DigiOne Signature and see what it can really do! :):)

    I have that board set in my system and will be testing it.  I have nothing to directly compare to so I do not know how good the coax input on the Kii Control is.  ( also want to get a better made cable for it.)  Soon.  

     

    Initial testing is positive.  Hard to A/B till I get a my second USBridge Sig in the system.

     

     

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites

    Better than your custom built Xeon?? The value is off the charts! I just bought a Ryzen 3950X. For me, HQPlayer is a must. If that wasn't the case, I might have considered returning it in favor of UsbBridge-Sig. Great review! 

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites

    You should try out this image:

     

    https://dietpi.com/phpbb/viewtopic.php?f=8&t=2317

     

    Easy to set up and many options.  I use naa and squeezelite to stream Qobuz without issue.

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites

    Glad this was reviewed and posted–now we know where great sound can be had on the cheap with the right hardware and software wherewithal.

     

    Personally, "daunting" isn't the word, "inconvenient" is what comes to mind. Seems like there should be timely, up-to-date, written for newbs, screenshot and picture-driven tutorials/videos here at CA for these kinds of software set ups.

     

    @The Computer Audiophile wasn't there some talk about alternative/new content besides traditional articles a while back?

     

     

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites
    11 minutes ago, feelingears said:

    wasn't there some talk about alternative/new content besides traditional articles a while back?

    This is always on our radar. Do you have something specific in mind?

     

    I’m working on a new Geek Speak article with screenshots etc... for a new piece of hardware. It may be a while because the hardware is hard to get right now. The manufacturer contacted me, so I’m trying to get one soon. 

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites
    21 minutes ago, The Computer Audiophile said:

    This is always on our radar. Do you have something specific in mind?

     

     

    Well, you know how these various Linux or other audio software setups are rife with options for every option under the sun. It would be nice to have a brain-dead set of instructions on how to get most, if not all, of the way "there" to where you have music coming out of your "computer" gear. I'd imagine there are consistencies in setup to get to certain hardware or sound quality decision points for most potential users. At least for a couple of the main options like Pi and Linux and these Allo boxes.

     

    I imagine there are technically capable people like myself (gimme the benefit of the doubt, ha ha–I work in software) who don't have gobs of uninterrupted tweaking time but who are interested in the next step if it appears worth the effort. But then again, maybe the answers for people like me are products from Pro-Ject and Auralic. Anyway, just $0.02.

     

     

     

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites

    Usbridge Sig has been my first effort at dipping my toe into streaming music. Previously I built a fanless pc using Fidelizer pro and attached it to my Chord Qutest dac.

    It took me a whole day to get up and running with the supplied Volumio SD card. The instructions were mainly available online, in more than one place and were not user friendly or up to date. This disappointed me slightly as Allo described the package as "plug n play".

    I ordered Volumio from Allo but only the cheap SMPS. Whilst awaiting delivery I found the moOde forum and liked the fact that Tim the developer had baked in support for the Sig and a Comcast WiFi dongle so I decided to go down that route initially.

    When my package arrived, I struggled to get the SSD in my pc seen by the Sig. I was stumbling in the dark but one of the things I tried was to make the drive "shareable" from within Windows 10. I'd had to research how to find the IP address of the Sig and of the PC on my network.

    Within moOde I had to change a usb setting from UAC1.0 to UAC2.0 (this was in the System settings tab) and I had to specify that I was using a usb dac  (on the Audio tab but on a submenu of MPD options) and that it needed the software volume control. I also realised at some point that I needed to enter my Windows logon details into moOde.

    At this stage after much trial and error, I managed to hear music from internet radio via moOde and music on a usb stick plugged into the Sig. I still couldn't mount the drive in my pc or "NAS drive" as it is described within moOde. 

    I gave up and tried Volumio instead. This was much easier. The menus more intuitive. Qutest was listed within Volumio as a supported dac. WiFi worked but no volume control so I had to attach a preamp. This was version 2.632. I updated to version 2.657 but used a new SD card as I didn't want to mess with the original version supplied by Allo. I got vinyl like pops and clicks.

    Day 2 I decided to try moOde again and finally managed to get the path right so I could mount the SSD in my pc. This was the latest release version 6.3 and I was still plagued with random pops and clicks. However I could already tell that the sound was better than the directly connected pc and dac.

    From the forums I learned that my dac does not do "Linux native DSD" it converts DSD to PCM via DOP??? I don't even have any DSD files but apparently this is causing the clicks and pops. The solution is to use older versions of moOde that use the older 4.14 version of the kernel rather than the 4.19 version. I'm not totally happy about this downgrade as I suspect the older version is not as great as the latest, it does not include the optimisations and drivers that had been included for the Sig.

    MoOde did not look nice with my file system which is mainly classical music. Tim suggested that the music player was not really designed to handle the extra tags like composer, orchestra and conductor. This tagging problem was exacerbated by some of my files being WAV rather than FLAC. I worked around this initially by using my familiar Foobar player and switching on UPnP within MoOde. Subsequently I have converted the WAV files to FLAC and retagged everything to make it look right in MoOde. I was so happy with the clear detailed sound that I ordered the Shanti and was impressed by deeper and cleaner bass. I've connected the earth wire between Sig and Shanti and that seems to make the sound cleaner too.

    I'm hoping that a newer version of moOde will eventually be released that uses a kernel that will work with my dac - but apparently this kernel can only come from the Raspberry pi foundation!

    In conclusion, it's been a steep learning curve and definitely not plug and play but having dipped my toe into the streaming river, I've realised that while there's no going back, I've still not reached the other side!

     

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites

    Hello

     

      we are working on a software that will be ALLO official version for USbridge based on Moode. We have some big surprises coming...

     

    We are also working on better documentation , meanwhile.

     

       Please note that we have dedicated tech suport and we are making every effort to take care of every customer , however due to the fact that there are many open source players (Moode , Volumio , Ropiee , PcP , Max2play etc) its rather both an advantage and disadvantage .  Advantage is that each of those players will give you the power of open source , updated very often .

     

      Of course disadvantage is that its rather harder to use and take some getting used to . Overall we think its a positive. As long as you know how to play with a router setting (for example) you will be able to use Usbridge Sig with most OS (most players have GUIs)

     

     I see that above someone suggested it will be easier to use Pro-Ject (*easier to use) Note that that particular hardware uses Volumio player ... you can get the same player on Usbridge Sig

     

     

       At last , next time you buy a DAC , please ask the manufacturer if its compatible with Linux on DSD (only DSD has issues on Linux) . Linux audio is here to stay and  will probably grow in the upcoming years.

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites
    2 hours ago, allo.com said:

    Linux audio is here to stay and  will probably grow in the upcoming years.

    This reminds me of a panel I was on at RMAF around 2009. I told the audience that Linux was the future of audio. The “expert” manufacturers on the panel looked at me like I had no idea what I was talking about :~)
     

    Based on the number of Linux HiFi devices vs other operating systems available now, I’d also say Linux is here to stay. 

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites
    3 hours ago, The Computer Audiophile said:

    This reminds me of a panel I was on at RMAF around 2009. I told the audience that Linux was the future of audio. The “expert” manufacturers on the panel looked at me like I had no idea what I was talking about :~)
     

    Based on the number of Linux HiFi devices vs other operating systems available now, I’d also say Linux is here to stay. 

    It is really amazing the number of devices that we now have running some variant of Linux.  Some 10 years on folks have learned!  Including myself.  In my system the fact that Linux MPD does so well was a very happy occurrence.  

     

    I think it is also wonderful that small companies such as Allo, Sonore, Qobuz, MoodeAudio, AudioLinux, Euphony, and so many more are bringing us so much enjoyment.  

     

    What is also interesting to me is the differences I can hear in all of these implementations.  

     

     

    Edited by bobfa

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites
    2 hours ago, Richard Dale said:

    I use Rigelian on an iPad in conjunction with moOde running on Rasperry Pis in my systems and it is a really nice combination. I haven’t found anything as good as BubbleUPnP on Android to use with a DLNA backend on my iPad. The advantage of Rigelian is that it uses the native MPD protocol and has canned configurations for moOde, Volumio and Rune to handle the cover art (you need a file called ‘folder.jpg’ in each album folder with cover art picture). You need to be able to mount the files on your NAS with SMB or NFS.

     

    Richard I just loaded up Rigelian it is VERY nice.  

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites

    Yes, these stories are the kinds of things that I suspect could be “standardized” with options and recommended configured at each step. 
     

    I don’t expect the infinite combinations to be represented, just perhaps the most likely supported ones (software, it requires support). 
     

    And there are the platforms: Mac, PC, Linux, combos, Roon, etc. 

     

    Anyway, thanks for considering. 

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites

    Newbie question: I want to stream hi res audio from Tidal and/or Quobuz to my Mytek Liberty DAC. The Allo gear - either the US Bridge Signature or the DigiOne Signature - looks really, really promising. But also a little daunting for someone who doesn’t tinker. What would be the most straightforward implementation of OS and Software/Applications to stream? Does an OS like Volumio or MoOde allow you to stream directly from Tidal/Quobuz or do you need another application - squeezelite? Mconnect? Roon? So confused. Any help would be greatly appreciated. 

     

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites

    Newbie question: I want to stream hi res audio from Tidal and/or Quobuz to my Mytek Liberty DAC. The Allo gear - either the US Bridge Signature or the DigiOne Signature - looks really, really promising. But also a little daunting for someone who doesn’t tinker. What would be the most straightforward implementation of OS and Software/Applications to stream? Does an OS like Volumio or MoOde allow you to stream directly from Tidal/Quobuz or do you need another application - squeezelite? Mconnect? Roon? So confused. Any help would be greatly appreciated. 

     

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites
    2 hours ago, Justin62 said:

    Newbie question: I want to stream hi res audio from Tidal and/or Quobuz to my Mytek Liberty DAC. The Allo gear - either the US Bridge Signature or the DigiOne Signature - looks really, really promising. But also a little daunting for someone who doesn’t tinker. What would be the most straightforward implementation of OS and Software/Applications to stream? Does an OS like Volumio or MoOde allow you to stream directly from Tidal/Quobuz or do you need another application - squeezelite? Mconnect? Roon? So confused. Any help would be greatly appreciated. 

     

    Justin,

     

    With Volumio you can use their software to stream directly from Tidal or Qobuz.  MoOde does not have the ability to play Tidal and Qobuz without "Help"...  Both of these run on the Allo USBridge Sig device.  

     

    I have a blog here that describes a lot of the things involved in Audio:

    I have not added to the blog in a while.  So here are a couple of notes to help and a promise to add more to the blog!

     

    Squeezelite is a software package that implements the squeezbox protocol.  Control software such as Logitech Media Server and Roon can control this software.

     

    Mconnect is an application that can control devices on your network that are UPnP compatible (Universal Plug and Play)

     

    Roon is a comprehensive music management and playback system that is sold as a subscription service.  

     

    -----------

     

    You can start a thread to ask for help!

     

    RJF

     

     

     

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites



    Create an account or sign in to comment

    You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

    Create an account

    Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

    Register a new account

    Sign in

    Already have an account? Sign in here.

    Sign In Now



×
×
  • Create New...